lozenge

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tro·che

(trō'kē), Avoid the mispronunciation trōsh.
A small, disc-shaped or rhombic body composed of solidifying paste containing an astringent, antiseptic, or demulcent drug, used for local treatment of the mouth or throat, the troche being held in the mouth until dissolved. The vehicle or base of the troche is usually sugar, made adhesive by admixture with acacia or tragacanth, fruit paste, made from black or red currants, confection of rose, or balsam of tolu.
Synonym(s): lozenge, morsulus, pastil (2) , pastille, trochiscus
[L. trochiscus fr. G. trochiskos, a little wheel, fr. trochos, a wheel]

lozenge

/loz·enge/ (loz´enj) [Fr.]
1. troche; a discoid-shaped, solid, medicinal preparation for solution in the mouth, consisting of an active ingredient incorporated in a suitably flavored base.
2. a triangular area of tissue marked for excision in plastic surgery.

lozenge

(lŏz′ĭnj)
n.
1. A small, medicated candy intended to be dissolved slowly in the mouth to lubricate and soothe irritated tissues of the throat.
2.
a. A four-sided planar figure with a diamondlike shape; a rhombus that is not a square.
b. Something having this shape, especially a heraldic device.

lozenge

See troche.

lozenge

Troche Drug delivery A sweetened disk-shaped pill  containing a topical therapeutic–eg, an astringent, antiseptic, or analgesic which is dissolved in the mouth for optimal efficacy

tro·che

(trō'kē)
A small, disc-shaped, or rhombic body composed of solidifying paste containing an astringent, antiseptic, or demulcent drug, used for local treatment of the mouth or throat; held in the mouth until dissolved.
Synonym(s): lozenge, pastille (2) , pastil.
[L. trochiscus fr. G. trochiskos, a little wheel, fr. trochos, a wheel]

tro·che

(trō'kē) Avoid the mispronunciation trōsh.
A small, discoid or rhombic body composed of solidifying paste containing an astringent, antiseptic, or demulcent drug, used for local treatment of mouth or throat. Troches are meant to dissolve in the mouth and are also called lozenges and pastilles.
Synonym(s): lozenge, morsulus.
[L. trochiscus fr. G. trochiskos, a little wheel, fr. trochos, a wheel]

lozenge

1. a medicated tablet or disk; a troche.
2. a triangular area of tissue marked for excision in plastic surgery.
3. a name given to the chestnut-colored spot on the head of Blenheim type Cavalier King Charles and King Charles spaniels. Called also 'kissing spot'.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of zinc acetate lozenges was not modified by age, sex, race, allergy, smoking, or baseline common cold severity.
Taken one hour before bedtime, one Solusnore lozenge is enough for a full night's sleep and can help prevent snoring for up to eight hours - you'll even wake up with minty-fresh breath
Among 199 patients with the common cold who participated in three randomized, placebo-controlled trials, the effect of zinc lozenges was not modified by allergy status, smoking, symptom severity, age, sex or ethnic group.
Given orally, the drug is almost entirely eliminated on first-pass metabolism, so she and her coinvestigators had flumazenil compounded at a pharmacy in two formulations: a 6-mg sublingual lozenge and a transcutaneous lotion in a dispenser providing 3 mg of flumazenil per click of the device.
THE lozenges taste a bit like Extra Strong Mints, with a similar grainy texture.
The company expects the unique lozenges to catch on with American consumers, as they have elsewhere.
Comment: This study demonstrates that the use of lozenges containing L.
Our laboratory has screened the lozenges that have a natural active ingredient against almost 24 bacterial cultures and 14 fungal cultures that are highly pathogenic to humans.
Under this agreement, Silanes will market BioGaia's oral health lozenges under its diabetes care brand ProBucal-D.
In 1984, findings from the first double-blind human study on zinc lozenges for common colds was published.
ABI JACKSON seeks soothing salvation with new sugar-free lozenges WHAT IS IT?