social class

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Related to Low class: lower class

social class

1. Social standing or position. Synonym: socioeconomic status
2. A group of people with shared culture, privilege, or position.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I think he should recall some "low class" actions done by the Ducks.
Out of four bullets, two can be said to improving the player development, while the other two could be said to be more advantageous to ownership's bottom line (Renovations to Pirate City, and purchasing a low Class A team and relocating it to Bradenton).
A slow start at low Class A Burlington, however, kept him from making the leap.
Results indicate high prevalence of malnutrition (under nutrition) among the elderly population, differences between males and females and between the two socio-economic classes were remarkable; 13% and 7% for males and females within the high class compared to 20 and 17% for males and females within the low class. Overweight as a risk to obesity was common to all groups (20-67%), but particularly among oldest women and men in the high socio-economic class (67% and 57% respectively).
John doesn't display a sense of "low class" as a certain gentleman proclaims in the March '05 Crossfire.
(I use 'low class' quite freely as I'm not a follower of Mr Blair's PC brigade; men and women gave their lives so we may have free speech).
Bryn is a stonecutter's daughter (low class) and she is chosen to attend a special school where she immediately becomes the object of hatred from another new student, Clea, a princess.
(B) Low class grades in mathematics, reading, and/or writing which would indicate that the student may not be promoted to the next grade.
It is being billed as the deciding round in a spat dating back six years, when Lopez said Paltrow could not act, and Paltrow hit back, suggesting Lopez was low class.
He revealed: "She told Charlotte, 'We've come from a low class family to an upper class family.
The cleansing job, held by hundreds of thousands of men across rural Africa, is seen as low class but essential to "purifying" women.