Lovesickness


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The expression of emotional pain that follows when one person continues to love another and that love is not reciprocated to the degree desired
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Lovesickness," the author used aliases for all the characters.
Dawson, 'Lovesickness and Neoplatonism', 129-30, points out that lovesickness was commonly associated with melancholy and illness in texts such as Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy and even in Ficino's Commentary.
The song-cycle, with fifty adwar, covers a wide range of topics (note the order): Calendar (weekdays; Arab, Copt, and "Byzantine" months); Faith (iman, Islam in general, "The Five Pillars"; law; the four law schools; ritual purifications); Hadith (collections, transmitters); Quran (chapters; commentaries); Philology (grammar and rhetoric, poetry and the Maqamat); Magic and Astrology; Love and Lovesickness (medicine); Sports and Leisure.
I'm not feeling so good, Doctor."--recalls the lovesickness, tropical malady, ill condition of Apichatpong's other films.
The poet's description of her physical condition is intended to underscore her yearning for her friend rather than lovesickness. The image of the wutong leaf thus assists in constructing the writer-friend identity of the speaking voice through appropriating the traditional image of earlier women writers and the rhetoric of heterosexual love relationship.
I personally don't believe in lovesickness, especially after a break-up, as I find most couples get back together simply because they haven't met anyone else, or just because they can't stand being alone.
Tin contends that this way of thinking also extended to medicine, where since the Renaissance, lovesickness was described as a pathology.
It symbolizes not only her curing his fever but also his lovesickness. My wife, the theater artist and experimental filmmaker Janie Geiser, and I became a couple just before I started to shoot The Pharaoh's Belt.
In her seventh album, Ace, she provocatively braids together lovesickness, sensuality and a strong sense of selfhood in grown-up, carefully paced tunes.
In those first thirty tales there are some violent deaths and some lovesickness, of course.
In her dream a passionate romance blossoms but when she wakes she remains preoccupied with her dream affair and becomes consumed by lovesickness before wasting away and dying.
She later has a portrait of herself done and dies of lovesickness, only to be brought back to life by the lover, who has fallen in love with her portrait.