lycanthropy

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lycanthropy

 [li-kan´thro-pe]
a delusion in which the patient believes that he is a wolf or other animal or that he can change into one.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·can·thro·py

(lī-kan'thrŏ-pē),
The morbid delusion that one is a wolf, possibly a mental atavism of the werewolf superstition.
[G. lykos, wolf, + anthrōpos, man]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lycanthropy

(lī-kăn′thrə-pē)
n.
A delusion that one has become or assumed the characteristics of a wolf or other animal.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ly·can·thro·py

(lī-kan'thrŏ-pē)
The morbid delusion that one is a wolf.
[G. lykos, wolf, +anthrōpos, man]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Loup Garou, derived from the French, is the name given to werewolves and vampires in Haiti.
of Dahomean origin, are generally protective, guardian powers, the Petro loa represent aggressive action, a response to the history of enslavement and violence: "For it was the Petro cult, born in the hills, nurtured in secret, which gave both the moral force and the actual organization to the escaped slaves who plotted and trained, swooped down upon the plantations and led the rest of the slaves in the revolt that, by 1804, had made of Haiti the second free colony in the western hemisphere, following the United States."(88) Loup Garou is, then, an appropriate choice of protagonist in a poem that satirically masks its own complex cultural kinships behind a polarized drama of cultural slavery and revolt.
The Petro Loup Garou is reborn as a North American cowboy (and in recent years a new cowboy loa has in fact appeared in Brazil), though this is not quite accurate; rather, he is reborn as a popular culture idea of a cowboy and much more.
That forlorn structure is one of the leftover set pieces from Loup Garou, a site-specific show that Slie created in collaboration with director Kathy Randels and the poet Raymond "Moose" Jackson and performed here last fall.
Loup Garou, a collaboration between Slie's Mondo Bizarro and Randels's ArtSpot Productions, exemplifies the re-energized theatre scene that's emerged in the Crescent City in the wake of Hurricane Katrina's destruction.