Kelvin, Lord

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Kelvin, Lord

(kel′vĭn)
Sir William Thomson (First Baron Kelvin of Largs), Brit. physicist, 1824–1907.

Kelvin scale

The temperature scale that uses the kelvin as the unit of measurement and in which absolute zero is equal to minus 273.15° on the Celsius scale. On the Kelvin scale the freezing point of water is 273.15°K, and the boiling point 373.15°K.

Kelvin thermometer

A thermometric scale in which absolute zero is 0°K; the freezing point of water is 273.15°K; and the boiling point of water is 373.15°K. Thus 1°K on the Kelvin scale is exactly equivalent to 1°C.
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References in classic literature ?
Then came Sir William Thomson, latterly known as Lord Kelvin. It was fitting that he should be there, for he was the foremost elec- trical scientist at that time in the world, and had been the engineer of the first Atlantic Cable.
It was thought the machinery had been constructed under the supervision and direction of Sir JamesThomson, later Lord Kelvin, who was resident in Bridge of Allan.
Challenged by Lord Kelvin's claims that earth and sun were too young to give evolution sufficient time to do its work, especially in the human case, where care for the weak blunts the edge of natural selection, Darwin leaned on Lamarckian thoughts to accelerate the process.
"Since the 19th century, when Lord Kelvin predicted that Earth should cool to be a dead planet within a hundred million years, geophysicists have struggled with the mystery that the Earth has kept a fairly constant temperature over more than 4.5 billion years," Nolet says.
The second half of the 19th century saw an impressive period of activity in chemistry, physics, medicine and engineering, including the work of Lord Kelvin, arguably the pre-eminent scientist of the period.
Then there's mathematical physicist and engineer Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), whose major contribution was in thermodynamics.
(Renn and Stachel 1999) It is this rotational characteristic that threads MacCullagh's influence all throughout modern theory and most importantly resurfaces at a critical point in Lord Kelvin's work.
Let us delve into history and recall in this context the physicist Lord Kelvin's quote.
Now we need help from Lord Kelvin. The Kelvin equation shows that a reduction in vapor pressure over a curved meniscus results in capillary condensation.
Lord Kelvin once remarked: "To measure is to know." All across the nonprofit sector, natural curiosity and the desire to improve results is causing a revolution in data, metrics, and measurement.
He joins James Clerk Maxwell, Lord Kelvin, John Logie Baird and James Watt in the Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame.