senescence

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senescence

 [sĕ-nes´ens]
the process of growing old; see also aging. adj., adj senes´cent.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·nes·cence

(sē-nes'ens),
The state of being old.
[L. senesco, to grow old, fr. senex, old]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

se·nes·cence

(sĕ-nes'ĕns)
The state of being old.
[L. senesco, to grow old, fr. senex, old]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

senescence

the process of growing old which occurs in all species and is typified by a gradual slowing down of METABOLISM and breakdown of tissues, often accompanied by endocrinal changes.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Senescence

Aging.
Mentioned in: Aging
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·nes·cence

(sĕ-nes'ĕns)
The state of being old.
[L. senesco, to grow old, fr. senex, old]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
So if we want to consistently fire up our longevity genes then healthy living needs to be a daily way of life.
The discovery of a region on chromosome 4 as the likely location of a gene or genes associated with longevity and the subsequent discovery of a specific longevity gene, MTP, was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (August 28, 2001 and November 10, 2003).
When food is scarce, FoxO factors shuttle from the cytoplasm back into the nucleus and activate longevity genes, which help the organism make it through lean times until food is available.
So living a lifestyle that is fun, easy to follow, and known to activate longevity genes that are associated with longer life makes a big difference.
Some researchers are beginning to look for longevity genes in the confined gene pool of a population already extensively studied for various genetic disorders.
Imagine one molecule so powerful that it affects whether you get heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, macular degeneration, hearing and memory loss, and arthritis: one molecule that can determine whether your diet to lose weight succeeds or fails, one molecule that has the power to turn longevity genes on or off within a few minutes.
And there are still many people in this country who believe that the best hope for the monarchy in the 21st century will be if the Queen inherits the longevity genes of her mother and reigns for another 20 years at least.
Since its inception in 1998, Ellison's Medical Foundation has provided more than $300 million to fund basic biomedical research on aging relevant to understanding life span development processes and age-related diseases and disabilities, including stem cells, telomeres, longevity genes, DNA and mitochondrial damage, Werner Syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, neural development, degeneration and cognitive decline, and cellular response systems to aging and toxins.
The Ellison Medical Foundation has also funded major initiatives in longevity genes and life span extension.
"Joseph Maroon offers the first-ever inside look at the amazing research that has led to the discovery of resveratrol and similar substances with the miraculous ability to activate our own longevity genes. He also offers his own diet plan and sound, reader-friendly advice for living a longer, healthier, and more balanced life.
It is evident that I have longevity genes," he concludes.
One of Life Extension's most important initiatives is determining the molecular mechanisms of aging and the retardation of aging, and understanding how longevity genes are altered by interventions that mimic the effects of caloric restriction, a method that has been shown to significantly extend life span in mammals.