infrared

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infrared

 [in″frah-red´]
denoting electromagnetic radiation of wavelength greater than that of the red end of the spectrum, i.e., of 0.75–1000 μm. Infrared rays are sometimes subdivided into long-wave or far infrared (about 3.0–1000 μm) and short-wave or near infrared (about 0.75–3.0 μm). They are capable of penetrating body tissues to a depth of 1 cm. Sources of infrared rays include heat lamps, hot water bottles, steam radiators, and incandescent light bulbs. Infrared rays are used therapeutically to promote muscle relaxation, to speed up the inflammatory process, and to increase circulation to a part of the body. See also heat.

in·fra·red (IR, ir),

(in-fră-red'),
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths between 730 and 1000 nm.

infrared

/in·fra·red/ (-red´) denoting electromagnetic radiation of wavelength greater than that of the red end of the spectrum, having wavelengths of 0.75–1000 μm; sometimes subdivided into long-wave or far i. (about 3.0–1000 μm) and short-wave or near i. (about 0.75–3.0 μm).

in·fra·red

(in'fră-red)
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths between 770-1000 nm.

infrared

the electromagnetic radiation in the region between red light and radio waves. see ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

infrared (IR) (inˑ·fr·redˈ),

n electromagnetic radiation of longer wavelength than red light in the range of 730 nanometres (nm) to about 1 millimetre (mm).

infrared (IR)

Radiant energy of wavelengths between the extreme red wavelengths of the visible spectrum and a wavelength of a few millimetres. The wave band comprising radiations between 780 and 1400 nm is referred to as IR-A. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause visual loss (e.g. eclipse blindness) and cataract. The waveband comprising radiations between 1400 and 3000 nm is referred to as IR-B. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause cataract and corneal opacity. The wave band comprising radiations between 3000 and 1 ✕ 106 nm (or 1 mm) is referred to as IR-C. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause cataract (heat-ray cataract). See eclipse blindness; absorptive lens; infrared optometer.

infrared

denoting electromagnetic radiation of wavelength greater than that of the red end of the spectrum, having wavelengths of 0.75-1000 μm. Infrared rays are sometimes subdivided into long-wave or far infrared (about 3.0-1000 μm) and short-wave or near infrared (about 0.75-3.0 μm). They are capable of penetrating body tissues to a depth of 10 mm. Sources of infrared rays include heat lamps, hot water bottles, steam radiators and incandescent light bulbs.
Infrared rays are used therapeutically to promote muscle relaxation, to speed up the inflammatory process, and to increase circulation to a part of the body. See also heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Javelin's long-wave infrared seeker is resistant to countermeasures and battlefield obscurants, which is critical in combat," said Howard Weaver, Javelin Joint Venture vice president.
The study was designed to determine that long-wave infrared imaging can be used to identify skin temperature changes associated with underlying tissue changes.
On board Orbital's four-stage ground-launch Taurus rocket will be DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite, which carries a sophisticated telescope that collects images of the Earth, during the day and at night, in 15 spectral bands ranging from visible to long-wave infrared.
Flameless catalytic gas heating systems for both roll- and sheet-fed thermoformers use long-wave infrared energy to reduce operating costs and enhance control and uniformity of process.
In addition to its work producing the CLU's infrared detector, Dewar cooler sensor assemblies, DRS also manufactures its cooled long-wave infrared detectors, its long-life cryogenic coolers, and assembles its vacuum Dewar and supporting command & control electronics.
The helmet-mounted goggle will digitally combine video imagery from a low-light-level visible sensor and an uncooled long-wave infrared sensor on a single color display located in front of the soldier's eye.