long-term memory

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memory

 [mem´o-re]
the mental faculty that enables one to retain and recall previously experienced sensations, impressions, information, and ideas. The ability of the brain to retain and to use knowledge gained from past experience is essential to the process of learning. Although the exact way in which the brain remembers is not completely understood, it is believed that a portion of the temporal lobe of the brain, lying in part under the temples, acts as a kind of memory center, drawing on memories stored in other parts of the brain.
impaired memory a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to remember bits of information or behavioral skills.
immunologic memory the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to a subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure. See also memory cells and immune response.
long-term memory the aspect of memory in which knowledge is stored permanently, to be activated when cued; it is theoretically unlimited in capacity.
recent memory the ability to recall events from the immediate past.
remote memory the ability to recall events from the distant past.
screen memory a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal or “screen” another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory what one is conscious of at a given moment; in contrast to long-term memory it is of limited capacity (about seven items) and will be lost unless rehearsed and related to information in long-term memory.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

long-term mem·o·ry (LTM),

the phase of the memory process considered the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, then coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval; material and information retained in LTM underlie cognitive abilities.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

long-term memory

Anterograde memory, long-term potentiation, remote memory Neurology Memory in which information is stored in a permanent or semipermanent fashion. See Memory. Cf Short-term (immediate) memory.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

long-term mem·o·ry

(LTM) (lawng'tĕrm mem'ŏ-rē)
That phase of the memory process considered the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval; material and information retained in LTM underlies cognitive abilities.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

long-term mem·o·ry

(LTM) (lawng'těrm mem'ǒ-rē)
Phase of memory process considered as the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, then coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rumerlart (1980) and Ulric Neisser (1982) have proposed that long term memory is organized in terms of schemata that give us expectations about objects and events.
(13) Getting information into the long term memory is one thing; getting it out can be quite another.
ERIC Descriptors: Long Term Memory; Lecture Method; Memory; Instruction; Brain; Cognitive Style; Retention (Psychology)

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