Lone Star tick

Lone Star tick

A hard tick native to the southern US, as well as Central and South America, which is a vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever and occasionally Lyme disease.

Lone Star tick

Amblyomma americanum A 3-host–wild animal, domestic animal, hard tick native to southern US, Central and South America, which is a vector of RMSF and occasionally Lyme disease. See Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Lone Star tick

(lōn stahr tik)
Amblyomma americanum; primary insect vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Tick is found in southern and western U.S. Hosts include dogs and farm animals.
[fr. Lone Star State, nickname of state of Texas]

lone star tick

see amblyommaamericanum.
References in periodicals archive ?
5), (6) The 10-fold increase likely is due to a combination of increased incidence, better repotting, and possibly increased exposure to lone star tick habitat through outdoor work and recreation, says Erik Hofmeister, veterinary medical officer with the U.
The link between the lone star tick and induced vegetarianism is still not quite clear, but for those who live within the danger zone, avoiding tick bites is a smart move if you want to keep eating steaks, hamburgers and chops.
Researchers traced the delayed allergic response to bites from a tick - specifically the Lone Star tick.
By the next day, they were identified as nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum L.
All plots were thoroughly sampled by drag cloth twice prior to the study; not one lone star tick was collected.
ewingii, and is also carried by the Lone Star tick.
americanum (commonly known as the lone star tick for the silvery white spot on its dorsal surface), this tick was soon implicated as a potential vector for E.
Another bacterium, Borrelia lonetari Barbour, has been identified from the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum (L.
Earlier studies with the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, demonstrated that the tick is not evenly distributed in nature, but "clumps" or "clusters" instead (2,3).
Willy Burgdorfer (the "discoverer" of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme spirochete) as stating that the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum) in Missouri is responsible for spreading Lyme, and also in Texas and New Jersey.
Easily confused with early Lyme disease, STARI is a distinct, idiopathic entity associated with bite of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (7,8).
The unique delayed reaction of several hours after eating meat implicated the lone star tick, which in the female, possesses a distinctive, readily identifiable white spot on the top center of its abdomen.