Lolita

(redirected from Lolitas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Lolita

An underage girl (i.e., a legal minor) who has sex with older men.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet the Lolita of the book--the young, asexual tomboy exploited by the manipulative older man--is not the representation that is stereotypically thought of by the word Lolita.
In 1959, Simone de Beauvoir associated Brigitte Bardot's performance in And God Created Woman (1956) with Lolita, further distancing the popular representation from that of the book.
In terms of social representations, the Lolita of the book is a negatively sanctioned representation--an older man seducing a young girl--which is viewed within the culture as both dangerous and transgressive--a socially heretical position--and thus is a representation to be avoided (Gillespie, 2008).
"There is also Classical Lolita, which is more mature looking," she said.
One thing all Lolita styles have in common is the distinct hint of sexuality and burlesque.
"Japanese girls love cute things, but they also love things that are slightly disturbing," said designer Maiko Fujii, standing next to a girl modeling her interpretation of Snow White, decked out in Gothic Lolita lingerie.
Lolita is not at all a coherent psychological phenomenon, unlike traditional female heroines--unlike, by the way, many of Nabokov's other heroines.
Lolita's words are often deeper and more sophisticated than would be appropriate for a twelve-or fourteen-year old American teenager.
Lolita's death could also be read in the broader context of the novel.
The colour and feel of the off-white dentine have by now come to be closely associated with Lolita's tantalizingly smooth skin and the maddeningly pale legs of a fellow-nymphet (Lolita, pp.
That Lolita's writer must have been fully aware of Dr Bloom's address in Dublin, and the importance of that address, is revealed by the fact that Professor Nabokov inserts a parenthetical correction into a passage he quotes from the eighth episode of Ulysses in his Cornell lectures.
Another Joyce-like touch reminiscent of the sexually ambiguous characters of the Bella/Bello Cohen type, or the occasionally feminized Bloom himself in Ulysses, is the fact that Fate is not the only gender-bender in Lolita. The celebrated dramatist and scriptwriter Clare Quilty is always accompanied by his secretary, one Vivian Darkbloom.