Lolita

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Lolita

An underage girl (i.e., a legal minor) who has sex with older men.
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In 1959, Simone de Beauvoir associated Brigitte Bardot's performance in And God Created Woman (1956) with Lolita, further distancing the popular representation from that of the book.
In terms of social representations, the Lolita of the book is a negatively sanctioned representation--an older man seducing a young girl--which is viewed within the culture as both dangerous and transgressive--a socially heretical position--and thus is a representation to be avoided (Gillespie, 2008).
Lolita has become another name for a sexually seductive young woman anchored to known representations such as vamp or sex kitten.
There is also Classical Lolita, which is more mature looking," she said.
One thing all Lolita styles have in common is the distinct hint of sexuality and burlesque.
Japanese girls love cute things, but they also love things that are slightly disturbing," said designer Maiko Fujii, standing next to a girl modeling her interpretation of Snow White, decked out in Gothic Lolita lingerie.
Lolita is not at all a coherent psychological phenomenon, unlike traditional female heroines--unlike, by the way, many of Nabokov's other heroines.
The pomegranate seed swallowed is the token of this return, symbolizing many things at the same time: life, fertility, marriage, death, and resurrection, That is why Lolita fittingly dies when she gives birth to her "still-born" daughter; they both have to return to Hades.
According to him, the village Gray Star, where Lolita dies, is nothing other than Nabokov's gray realm--his brain (Dolinin 13-14).
15) Professor Nabokov also provides the Joyce reader of his own Lolita with strong evidence of his awareness of where his character's name came from.
17) The shadowy doubling in Lolita does not stop here.
This subtext is reinforced, among other things, by hints scattered throughout the first, Ramsdale, episodes of Lolita of certain qualities of a minor character called Leslie Thomson, endearing this black gardener and chauffeur not only to the narrator but very likely to the implied author, too.