validity

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validity

 [vah-lid´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a measuring device measures what it intends or purports to measure.
construct validity the degree to which an instrument measures the characteristic being investigated; the extent to which the conceptual definitions match the operational definitions.
content validity verification that the method of measurement actually measures what it is expected to measure; see also face validity.
external validity the extent to which study findings can be generalized beyond the sample used in the study.
face validity a type of content validity, determining the suitability of a given instrument as a source of data on the subject under investigation, using common-sense criteria.
internal validity the extent to which the effects detected in a study are truly caused by the treatment or exposure in the study sample, rather than being due to other biasing effects of extraneous variables.
predictive validity the effectiveness of one set of test or research results as a predictor of the outcome of future experiments or tests.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē),
An index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity

[valid′itē]
(in research) the extent to which a test measurement or other device measures what it is intended to measure. A data collection tool should accurately reflect the concept that it is intended to measure. Kinds of validity include construct validity, content validity, current validity, and predictive validity. Compare reliability.

methodological quality

The extent to which the design and conduct of a trial are likely to have prevented systematic errors (bias). Variation in quality can explain variation on the results of trials included in a systematic review. Rigourously designed (better quality) trials are more likely to yield results that are closer to the “truth” (i.e., unbiased).

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended.

validity 

The extent to which a measurement correctly measures what it is supposed to measure or to which extent the findings of an investigation reflect the truth. In health sciences, validity is commonly assessed by determining the sensitivity and specificity factors. See reliability; sensitivity; specificity.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity,

n the degree to which data or results of a study are correct or true.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that the failure of equating Aristotle's view with logical validity should not be interpreted as Aristotle's failure to account for inferential necessity.
Logicians claim that logical validity is totally compatible with inferential necessity, in so far as validity underlines the form of an argument, independently of its content.
The crucial dilemma for logical validity lies in its incapacity to grasp the relevance of Aristotle's distinction between complete and incomplete deductions.
A careful study of the text shows how Aristotle equates inferential necessity with complete deducibility (and not with deducibility), and those who focus on logical validity neglect this view.
To speak of logical validity does not allow one to say that incomplete deductions, unlike complete ones, are based on potential inferential necessity.
Incompleteness is a matter of potential completeness, and logical validity fails to take potentiality into account.
11) It is mildly paradoxical that the fact that this mistake is so widespread should be explainable by the extraordinary influence of Quine's views on analyticity and logical validity.