validity

(redirected from Logical truth)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

validity

 [vah-lid´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a measuring device measures what it intends or purports to measure.
construct validity the degree to which an instrument measures the characteristic being investigated; the extent to which the conceptual definitions match the operational definitions.
content validity verification that the method of measurement actually measures what it is expected to measure; see also face validity.
external validity the extent to which study findings can be generalized beyond the sample used in the study.
face validity a type of content validity, determining the suitability of a given instrument as a source of data on the subject under investigation, using common-sense criteria.
internal validity the extent to which the effects detected in a study are truly caused by the treatment or exposure in the study sample, rather than being due to other biasing effects of extraneous variables.
predictive validity the effectiveness of one set of test or research results as a predictor of the outcome of future experiments or tests.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē),
An index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity

[valid′itē]
(in research) the extent to which a test measurement or other device measures what it is intended to measure. A data collection tool should accurately reflect the concept that it is intended to measure. Kinds of validity include construct validity, content validity, current validity, and predictive validity. Compare reliability.

methodological quality

The extent to which the design and conduct of a trial are likely to have prevented systematic errors (bias). Variation in quality can explain variation on the results of trials included in a systematic review. Rigourously designed (better quality) trials are more likely to yield results that are closer to the “truth” (i.e., unbiased).

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended.

validity 

The extent to which a measurement correctly measures what it is supposed to measure or to which extent the findings of an investigation reflect the truth. In health sciences, validity is commonly assessed by determining the sensitivity and specificity factors. See reliability; sensitivity; specificity.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity,

n the degree to which data or results of a study are correct or true.
References in periodicals archive ?
If someone accepts the logicist thesis (Basic Truths) and takes the language of arithmetic at face value, then she will hold that the existence of numbers is a logical truth, and is thus analytic.
If the conventionalist is interested in logical truths precisely because they are necessary truths, then explicit conventions merely transmit necessity from one analytic truth to another by transforming obvious logical truths into obscure logical truths.
is not a logical truth, but what he calls a valid "logical schema.
Surely the claim that one who understands '&' is thereby justified in believing an instance of [&E] to be a logical truth is safer than Anselm's claims about what is entailed by understanding the concept of God
The purpose of this essay is to investigate Frege's conception of the knowledge and justification of the primitive logical truths, from which he intended to take his axioms.
36) (Carried back over to the discussion of facts, both would show only that all logical truths stand for the same fact.
I was particularly taken by his insistence that the remarks about facts at the beginning of the Tractatus are 'meant to be read in a way that is as vacuous as possible' (26), his explanation of Wittgenstein's argument that picturing the world presupposes the existence of simple objects (38-44), his discussion of the requirement that sense be determinate (54-60), his examination of the all-important Tractarian idea of propositions as pictures (68-74), his survey of Wittgenstein's remarks about generating all (meaningful) propositions from elementary propositions by means of a single truth-operator (83-98), and his analysis of how Wittgenstein's view of logical truth does--and does not--fall foul of the undecidability of predicate logic (106-08).
Part 3, devoted to providing a naturalized ground for logical truth, begins again with reasoned advice on what to avoid.
Donald Davidson has claimed that for every logical truth Sofa language L, a theory of meaning for L will entail that S is a logical truth of L.
Even those who have recently challenged this traditional conception of logic do not as a rule go on to equate knowledge of logical truth with collective belief.
Should the models considered for evaluating logical truth in higher-order logic be confined to standard ones?
147); and from there by gradual steps to the notions of contradiction and entailment, the truth-functions, logical truth, first-order quantification, and so forth.