validity

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validity

 [vah-lid´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a measuring device measures what it intends or purports to measure.
construct validity the degree to which an instrument measures the characteristic being investigated; the extent to which the conceptual definitions match the operational definitions.
content validity verification that the method of measurement actually measures what it is expected to measure; see also face validity.
external validity the extent to which study findings can be generalized beyond the sample used in the study.
face validity a type of content validity, determining the suitability of a given instrument as a source of data on the subject under investigation, using common-sense criteria.
internal validity the extent to which the effects detected in a study are truly caused by the treatment or exposure in the study sample, rather than being due to other biasing effects of extraneous variables.
predictive validity the effectiveness of one set of test or research results as a predictor of the outcome of future experiments or tests.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē),
An index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity

[valid′itē]
(in research) the extent to which a test measurement or other device measures what it is intended to measure. A data collection tool should accurately reflect the concept that it is intended to measure. Kinds of validity include construct validity, content validity, current validity, and predictive validity. Compare reliability.

methodological quality

The extent to which the design and conduct of a trial are likely to have prevented systematic errors (bias). Variation in quality can explain variation on the results of trials included in a systematic review. Rigourously designed (better quality) trials are more likely to yield results that are closer to the “truth” (i.e., unbiased).

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended.

validity 

The extent to which a measurement correctly measures what it is supposed to measure or to which extent the findings of an investigation reflect the truth. In health sciences, validity is commonly assessed by determining the sensitivity and specificity factors. See reliability; sensitivity; specificity.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity,

n the degree to which data or results of a study are correct or true.
References in periodicals archive ?
16) Thus, I submit, when it is said that a proposition is a logical truth, we should understand that as follows: there is a proposition that is expressed by a sentence, and that sentence has a certain structure; and that structure is such that it ensures that what the sentence expresses is true.
I offer two arguments that Bayesianism should be modified so as not to imply the logical infallibility of even the ideally rational; the first relies both on a plausible principle of ideal reasoning--that one should not go beyond her evidence--and the claim that an ideally rational agent might, have little evidence for a logical truth.
However, the more logical truth is that walls cannot collapse because of trumpets and shouting, while historical truth tells that ancient Jericho was a small village, and had no walls to begin with.
Formula (7), which is a logical truth in the intensional setting of the protocalculus, has one oddity worth mentioning: two of its component formulas, the first and the last, can appropriately be construed as ~p logically implies q'; in other words, when ~p [contains] q' is assumed to be true in what purports to be an extensional setting, it is a mere notational variant of ~p LI> q'.
But if i is a logical truth, then it is entailed by anything; and if I assent to anything and I think of i at all, then I must also assent to i.
147); and from there by gradual steps to the notions of contradiction and entailment, the truth-functions, logical truth, first-order quantification, and so forth.
Quine argued that to say logical truth is "true by convention" is not so much to introduce a new species of truth as to shift the topic to rules of reduction.
Part 3, devoted to providing a naturalized ground for logical truth, begins again with reasoned advice on what to avoid.