logarithmic scale

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Logarithmic scaleclick for a larger image
Fig. 213 Logarithmic scale . Note the smoothness of the curve as compared to the linear scale curve, for which the data are the same.

logarithmic scale

a scale in which the values of a variable are expressed as logarithms. Such transformations of data are often employed to simplify the drawing of lines on a graph, where the variable values are spread over a wide range. See Fig. 213 . A good example of the use of log scales is seen in Fig. 182 where the LOG PHASE of a microbial GROWTH CURVE is illustrated. Compare LINEAR SCALE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The slope on log scale algorithm performed poorly because the largest proportional rate-of-change for the number of cases tended to occur during periods of very low case numbers (perhaps reflecting chance fluctuations).
Thus, whereas a linear scale would progress from 1 to 2 to 3, the log scale would progress from 1 to 10 to 100.
AVC asymptotic variance of log scale parameter at the design stress for the constant-stress plan
All commonly used hardwood log scales are more than a century old.
Looking at the figure "Mapping Sizes" (opposite), we see three levels of the log scale from left to right.
Mapped on the log scale, it comes into perspective.
Overrun refers to the difference between the actual volume of lumber produced by a mill and the log scale volume.
A number of factors influence the BF/CF relationship, including log scale, log diameter and length, and merchantability standards related to log defect.
LO is the amount of lumber actually recovered in excess of the amount predicted by the log scale, expressed as a percentage of the log scale.
In this study, 1,700 random hardwood logs from 17 sawmills located across eight eastern states were measured, analyzed, and classified for level of sweep based on the log scale deduction percentage attributed to sweep.
Therefore, application of the proposed mass wormhole deduction rule resulted in a much lower net log scale for the wormy logs (Table 2) than the actual lumber volume measured in the recovery study.