Loffler endocarditis

Löf·fler en·do·car·di·tis

(lŏrf'lĕr),
fibroplastic constrictive parietal endocarditis with eosinophilia, an endocarditis of obscure cause characterized by progressive congestive heart failure, multiple systemic emboli, and eosinophilia.

Löf·fler en·do·car·di·tis

(lĕrf'lĕr en'dō-kahr-dī'tis)
Fibroplastic constrictive parietal endocarditis with eosinophilia, an endocarditis of obscure cause characterized by progressive congestive heart failure, multiple systemic emboli, and eosinophilia.
Synonym(s): Löffler parietal endocarditis.

Löffler endocarditis

(lef'ler)
[Wilhelm Löffler, Swiss physician, 1887–1972]
Endocarditis associated with hypereosinophilia and fibroplastic thickening of the endocardium.
Synonym: eosinophilic cardiomyopathy

Löffler,

Wilhelm, Swiss physician, 1887-1972.
Löffler disease - Synonym(s): Löffler endocarditis
Löffler endocarditis - fibroplastic parietal endocarditis with eosinophilia, an endocarditis of obscure cause characterized by progressive congestive heart failure, multiple systemic emboli, and eosinophilia. Synonym(s): Löffler disease; Löffler syndrome (2)
Löffler parietal fibroplastic endocarditis - sclerosis of the endocardium in the presence of a high eosinophil count.
Löffler pneumonia - eosinophilic pneumonia.
Löffler syndrome - (1) Synonym(s): simple pulmonary eosinophilia; - (2) Synonym(s): Löffler endocarditis
References in periodicals archive ?
Endomyocardial biopsy was not performed as studies have shown its limitation reserved in excluding infiltrative disorders and being a blind procedure [4] Loffler endocarditis is more aggressive and rapidly progresses, affects mainly males and is associated with hypereosinophilia, thromboemboli, systemic arteritis; endomyocardial fibrosis occurs in a younger distribution, affects young children and is only variably associated with eosinophilia.
Hypereosinophilia associated with Loffler endocarditis usually is characterized by eosinophil counts exceeding 1500/cumm for at least 6 months.
The observation that patients with Loffler endocarditis have degranulated eosinophils in their peripheral blood supports the idea that these granules contain cardiotoxic substances, capable of causing the necrotic phase of endomyocardial disease, which leads to the thrombotic and fibrotic phases once the eosinophilia resolves.