Loeffler's syndrome

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Acute Pulmonary Eosinophilia

A self-limiting non-infectious inflammation in the lungs accompanied by increased eosinophils in tissue and peripheral blood.
Aetiology Unknown, or various drugs, parasitic infestation (especially ascariasis in children), nickel exposure, recent blood transfusion, or lymphangiography.
Clinical findings Chest pain, dry cough, fever, malaise, tachypnoea, dyspnoea, rash, wheezing.
Imaging Diffuse infiltrates on plain AP film.
Bronchoscopy Increased eosinophils.
Management APE may respond to corticosteroids.
Complications Restrictive cardiomyopathy due to pericardial fibrosis
Prognosis Often resolves without therapy; less commonly, it evolves to acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Loeffler's syndrome

A form of patchy pneumonia featuring fever, cough, difficulty in breathing, associated with a marked rise in the numbers of EOSINOPHIL white cells in the lungs and the circulating blood. (Wilhelm Loeffler, Swiss physician, b. 1887).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Loeffler's syndrome

The respiratory phase of ascariasis, marked by inflammation of the lungs and eosinophilia.
Mentioned in: Roundworm Infections
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following infection by ingestion or skin penetration, an acute respiratory illness, termed Loffler's syndrome, can develop with associated eosinophilia.
Although many infected individuals are asymptomatic, once the parasite is in the lungs it may cause chest burning, wheezing, and coughing, along with pneumonia-like symptoms (Loffler's syndrome).
Larvae that penetrate the lungs can cause Loffler's syndrome. The movement of adult worms can be asymptomatic and therefore go unrecognized.