local anaesthetic

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local anaesthetic

An ANAESTHETIC affecting only part of the body and not affecting consciousness. Local anaesthetics may be applied, usually by injection, directly to the part to be operated upon, or may be applied, at a distance, to the sensory nerves coming from the part (nerve block).
References in periodicals archive ?
The side effects appearing after administering lidocaine are the cause of, very often premature, classification of the patient as "allergic" to local anaesthetics, even though there is no evidence in detailed diagnostic examination.
The effect of nerve sheath on the action of local anaesthetics. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1965;150(1):160-4.
However, in their Cochrane database review, Gurusamy et al13 included 12 randomized controlled trials on use of intraperitoneal local anaesthetics in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Accidental lip injury with the use of long acting local anaesthetic has been reported as one of the adverse events [3].
Combinations of local anaesthetics have been used to enhance the onset of sensory and motor block.4 Certain drugs may be used as adjuvants to local anaesthetics to lower the dose of each agent, to enhance the quality and duration of block, to increase the analgesic effect and reducing the need for supplementary analgesics thus decreasing the incidence of adverse reactions.
Smith T 2004 Systemic toxic effects of local anaesthetics Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine 5 (4) 132-136
The exclusion criteria were coagulation disorder, neuromuscular, hepatic and renal disease, hypersensitivity to local anaesthetic, infection at the injection site, body mass index (BMI) >30 or <18.5 and use of a drug known to interact with neuromuscular blocking drugs.
Local anaesthetics are used to locally desensitise the tissues to allow surgical interventions.
Local anaesthetics, from lidocaine to the more recent ropivacaine, have been used as pre-emptive analgesics since the 1980s.
A risk-benefit assessment of topical percutaneous local anaesthetics in children.
Furthermore, in the area of local anaesthetics (where Astra is the world market leader), Zeneca has undertaken to reverse all arrangements relating to Chirocaine, a new long-acting local anaesthetic which Zeneca licensed-in last year.