lobbying

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lobbying

Attempting to shape legislation, influence legislators, or mold public opinion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interim Recovery Act Guidance for Lobbyist Communications
Second, all policymakers simultaneously announce individual access rules to citizens and lobbyists. Third, citizens choose, when feasible, whether to become a lobbyist or continue as a citizen with a policy proposal.
So now state senators think it might be a good idea if their colleagues reported whether lobbyists are actually paying them.
Statement signed by each principal or principal's representative stating that the lobbyist is authorized to represent the principal;
When thinking about why people hire lobbyists, Moore suspects that while a company/organization can train and do most of lobbying on their own internally, they often hire externally (a consultant lobbyist) in order to tell the CEO "we did everything we could.'"
Among the two lobbyists, The Lande Group was paid $ 50,000 in January- March quarter of 2017 -- the same as the money paid in each of the four quarters of 2016.
Asked by The Register-Guard to clarify whether the compensation for a private-sector in-house lobbyist also would not be deemed "money or other consideration," the Ethics Commission's executive director, Ron Bersin, demurred, saying the commission hadn't examined that specific question.
"That's an unfair position to put the governor in," said Deirdre Delisi, who served as Perry's chief of staff before becoming a lobbyist. "That's your job as a lobbyist, to go work it and try to get it fixed before going to the governor and asking for a veto.
Under the new law, the definition of what constituted a lobbyist expanded.
Calling for a register of lobbyists to be created, the political source said: "It is very important that the electorate feel confident that any influence from lobbyists on government ministers is readily accounted for and transparent.
Hugo Black of Alabama led an investigation into lobbying that found one congressman had received 816 telegrams about a bill-all written and paid for by a single utility company lobbyist. Black spoke out against the "highpowered, deceptive, telegram-fixing, letterframing, Washington-visiting lobby" and added, "Just contemplate what a good time people are having on your money in Washington!" That began a new focus on the problem that led to a 1946 law that clearly defined lobbyists and required them not only to register in both the House and the Senate but also to submit quarterly reports on money they received and spent and who it came from or went to.
Ahead of the upcoming review of the transparency register for lobbyists, a coalition of NGOs(1) are calling for stricter and more rigorous rules to be established.