lobbying

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lobbying

Attempting to shape legislation, influence legislators, or mold public opinion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(4) In the Canadian lobbying registry, a lobbying organization is referred to as (a) the "client organization" of the consultant lobbyist, or (b) the organization of the in-house lobbyist (in the case of a not-for-profit entity), or (c) the corporation of the in-house lobbyist (in the case of a for profit entity).
Many of the same restrictions apply to lobbying organization.
One of America's oldest Jewish lobbying organizations, the AJC has come under criticism in recent years.
"In our prime, we were rated the seventh-most powerful lobbying organization in the country," he said.
(AIPAC), a pro-Israel lobbying organization, (2) to an Israeli Embassy official and (3) to a
Robinson was the founder and president of TransAfrica, a lobbying organization that aims to influence U.S.
"We're primarily a lobbying organization representing the interests of, first and foremost, the independent insurance agent, as well as the insurance industry," he said.
According to the Human Rights Campaign, a lobbying organization that focuses on issues important to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender Americans, it is legal to fire workers based solely on their sexual orientation in 36 states.
Hoagland told the Board that NLC's greatest advantage as a lobbying organization is the connection that exists among elected officials.
"But in 1967 the YMBA members decided to go on their own because the MBA is really more of a national, lobbying organization. We, however, are not lobbying-based by any stretch."
Why should employees at organizations that happen to also have fitness centers -- along with day care and after-school programs -- pay for the legal challenges being brought by a tax-exempt lobbying organization of for-profit gyms?
In 1997, the Federation of Economic Organizations (Keidanren), Japan's most powerful business lobbying organization, adopted a voluntary action plan to keep CO2 emissions in 2010 to levels at or below those in 1990.