lobbying

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lobbying

Attempting to shape legislation, influence legislators, or mold public opinion.

lobbying,

n the act of influencing, by argumentation, the course of action of a legislator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roque said that international lobby groups have always lobbied themselves with opposition groups including human rights organizations.
Secretary general Francis Atwoli yesterday told the Star Uhuru should address unconstitutional issues lobby groups and other stakeholders are raising.
Oil industry lobby group Europia, supported by Vittorio Prodi (ALDE, Italy), argued that other uses of biomass might be better for the environment.
Finnish information technology lobby groups TTK and the Finnish Federation for Communications and Teleinformatics (FiCom) have reportedly suggested that the government allow tax write-offs on computer and Internet account expenses.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-6 October 2004-Two Finnish IT lobby groups suggest tax deductibility on Internet connections - report(C)1994-2004 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
IRISH lobby groups face a bleak future and must consolidate and reform if they are to survive, it has been claimed.
The project will also document the IP experience of the Kenyan gender lobby group during the PRSP process in Kenya to bring out challenges that will be shared with wider gender and macroeconomics lobby groups in Africa.
We can compare this conjecture to one where lobby groups are perfectly coordinated, by perhaps a planner, and determine optimal contributions for the group as a whole which is then divided across all individual members.
The criticism triggered a meeting between company officials and representatives from several gay lobby groups November 9, during which AOL emphasized its policies against hateful language.
While US lobby groups, American Trial Lawyers Association (ATLA) and the IT industry have fought and haggled about liability in the aftermath of the millennium bug, the rest of the world appears to have been oblivious to the consequences of the date change.
The lobby groups offer the government prospective political contributions, the size of which corresponds to the pollution tax policy selected (see Bernheim and Whinston [1986] for the original model and Grossman and Helpman [1994], Fredriksson [1997, 1998], Schleich [1997], and Aidt [1998] for applications).
In 1991, lobby groups weren't too pleased with House of Commons rule changes, which they said could jeopardize their ability to fight government bills.