Lobar hemorrhage

Lobar hemorrhage

Bleeding into one of the lobes of the brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recurrence of lobar hemorrhage: a red flag for cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation?
The bleeding site: 80 cases of lobar hemorrhage, 50 cases of basal ganglia hemorrhage; Glasgow coma score: 78 cases <5 points, 5 ~8 points in 42 cases, 9~13 points in 10 cases.
Surgery trials have also failed in this regard with the possible exception of superficial lobar hemorrhage cases.
This was the earliest type of model used to replicate lobar hemorrhage and also to study the mechanism of brain injury in perihematomal region [43, 44].
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage: A case report.
Acute lobar hemorrhage is treated with refraining from use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, and fine control of blood pressure to avoid intracranial hypertension.
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is now considered an important cause of lobar hemorrhage in the elderly (Vonsattel at al., 1991).
They cautioned that a recent study suggested that people with a history of lobar hemorrhage might be at particular risk from statin therapy Since their study "could not test this important subset" of stroke survivors, clinicians should remain cautious about prescribing statins for such patients, the researchers said.
With cerebral amyloid angiopathy, there is progressive amyloid deposition restricted to small- to medium-sized vessels of the brain that leads to fibrinoid necrosis and vascular frailty, and there is often associated diffuse multifocal white matter disease, and symptomatic lobar hemorrhage. The other common cause of cerebral microhemorrhages is chronic systemic hypertension, which leads to intimal hyperplasia and hyalinosis in deep, penetrating arterioles.
People who carried an apo e2 or e4 allele were 2.3-fold more likely to have a lobar hemorrhage than people without either of these alleles.
Blood volume and location High score in Ogilvy and Carter scale Size and localization of aneurism/hemorrhage recurrence Hyperglycemia Ischemic and hemorrhagic brain stroke High score in NIHSS and iScore (e) High ICH score (f) Low GCS Volume of hematoma that varies depending on location: (i) Basal ganglia hemorrhage [greater than or equal to] 60 cc, mortality 100% (ii) Lobar hemorrhage [greater than or equal to] 60 cc, mortality 71% (iii) Posterior fossa lethal hemorrhage: Cerebellar location > 30 cc Pontine location 5 cc Diabetes/hyperglycemia on admission Previous antiaggregation/anticoagulation Auricular fibrillation (a) GCS: Glasgow Coma Scale.