living will

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will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

living will

(liv'ing wil),
an advance directive that specifies the types of care a person does or does not want to receive in the event of becoming mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becoming permanently comatose. A document that names another person to make such decisions is known as a durable power-of-attorney for health care decisions. An advance directive can contain both types of instruction. See: advance directive.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

living will

n.
A document in which the signer states his or her wishes regarding medical treatment that sustains or prolongs life, especially by invasive or extraordinary means, for use if the signer becomes mentally incompetent or unable to communicate.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A statement made by an adult at a time when he/she has the capacity to decide for himself/herself about the treatments he/she wishes to accept or refuse, in circumstances in the future when he/she is no longer able to make decisions or communicate his/her preferences
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

living will

Right to die An advance medical directive in which a mentally-competent adult formally expresses his/her preferences regarding medical treatment, in the event of future incapacitation or incompetence to make medical decisions. See Advance directive, DNR, Health care proxy. Cf Durable powers of attorney, Euthanasia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

liv·ing will

(liv'ing wil)
Legal document used to indicate one's preference to die rather than be sustained artificially if sick or injured beyond the prospect of recovery.
See: advance directive
Synonym(s): durable power of attorney (2) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

living will

A document requesting and directing what should be done in the event of a person's later inability to express his or her wishes on medical management. The purpose is usually to try to ensure that exceptional measures are not taken to maintain life in the event of a terminal illness. The respecting of such a will has long been accepted in most States in the USA and has, since January 1998, also been a statutory right in Britain. The term refers to the fact that the writer's deposition may be enacted when he or she is still living. The Voluntary Euthanasia Society has recently produced a new draft will that also provides an opportunity for the patient to express the desire to be kept alive for as long as is reasonably possible.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

liv·ing will

(liv'ing wil)
Advance directive that specifies the types of care a person does or does not want to receive in the event of becoming mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becoming permanently comatose. A document that may also name another person to make such decisions is known as a durable power-of-attorney for health care decisions. An advance directive can contain both types of instruction.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about living will

Q. do we need the esophagus to live? If we were to take our esophagus away would we still live?

A. Principally, yes. Feeding can be done through a hole in the stomach (PEG). Life is possible this way, although one may argue about the quality of life in this situation.

Q. How long can an alcoholic expect to live? My nephew who was an alcoholic died in his early age of 35. My uncle who was also an alcoholic died in his age of 48. How long can an alcoholic expect to live?

A. I am sorry. My dad who is an alcoholic too always advice me from his experience that an alcoholic will die younger than they would if they were not using alcohol. There are two sides to this: physiological and psychological. The destructive effect that alcohol has on the human body when used to excess may shorten expected lifespan. This list is long, from brain damage to liver failure.
The psychological side is the likelihood that goofy behavior caused by the use of alcohol may kill them. The list here is endless. Driving while drunk, getting in violent confrontations, taking idiotic risks, using power tools while blitzed. One way or another, the odds are good that this person will die much earlier than if they were not drinking.

Q. how long do u live with lupus? why do we get lupus? why was i hit with it along with all my other medical problems? i dont understand why..

A. well i've had it now for 1 yr and i'm still going

More discussions about living will
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But if their living will says they don't want to be put on a ventilator, medical staff may feel bound to honor their wishes.
The value--and costliness--of living wills is easier to understand if you know what goes into them.
How to set up a living will It isn't necessary to appoint a lawyer to complete a living will, although lawyers do routinely draw them up as part of estate planning.
We developed a new living will with the goal of providing more information and structure for those scenarios outside of comfort care, in particular focusing on the common clinical decisions faced by health care providers and surrogates in the intensive care unit.
Selected socio-demographic data (age, gender, years working as a nurse, place of employment and previous training in living wills) were collected to determine if these variables were related to the survey results.
The living will requirement could actually yield similar results to restoring Glass-Steagall without actual re-enactment of the Depression-era la ws se parating commercial banking from investment banking, former FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair told Reuters TV earlier this month.
The living will is used if you become mentally incapable of making any decisions as you become unconscious or unfit.
(22) The idea for living wills as a measure to prepare for effective resolution of financial institutions began to gather support internationally during 2008.
The discussion of living wills pointed to benefits beyond those associated with handling a firm's failure and the challenges presented by the adoption of living wills as a standard.
Health care power of attorneys and living wills are both considered to be advanced health care directives (AHCDs).
The EU executive released a communication on crisis management, on 20 October (COM(2009) 561/4), which for the first time floated the idea of living wills', a bank's plan on how to wind up operations in the event of a crisis.
Following Miss Englaro's death, 41 Catholic priests signed an open letter advocating this procedure in similar cases and supporting living wills permitting doctors to do this.