homunculus

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homunculus

 [ho-mung´ku-lus]
a dwarf without deformity or disproportion of parts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ho·mun·cu·lus

(hō-mŭngk'yū-lŭs),
1. An exceedingly minute body that, according to the views of development held by some medical scientists of the 16th and 17th centuries, was contained in a sperm or an oocyte. From this preformed but infinitely small structure, the human body was thought to be developed.
See also: preformation theory, animalcule.
2. The distorted figure of a human superimposed on an illustration of the surface of the brain; used to demonstrate those portions of the body supplied by the various motor and sensory cortical regions.
[L. dim. of homo, man]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

homunculus

(hō-mŭng′kyə-ləs, hə-)
n. pl. homuncu·li (-lī′)
1. A diminutive human.
2. A miniature, fully formed individual believed by adherents of the early biological theory of preformation to be present in the sperm cell.

ho·mun′cu·lar adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A schematic representation of the volume of cerebral cortex dedicated to motor—precentral/Brodman’s areas 4, 6—or sensory—postcentral/Brodman’s area 3—with respect to each corporal region. The resulting image of a (somewhat grotesque) little man has hands and a tongue that are far more prominent than the trunk and extremities, indicating their relative importance
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ho·mun·cu·lus

(hō-mŭngk'yū-lŭs)
The figure of a human sometimes superimposed on pictures of the surface of the brain to represent the motor or sensory regions of the body represented there.
[L. dim. of homo, man]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
'Ah,' said the little man, 'you're a wag, ain't you?'
'This is a curious old house of yours,' said the little man, looking round him.
"You ought to join one," declared the little man seriously.
"If you are able to prove that you are better," said the Prince to the little man, "I will make you the Chief Wizard of this domain.
The little man shook his head, and scratched it ruefully as he contemplated this severe indisposition of a principal performer.
The little man crawled about in the hay-loft, and at last found a snug place to finish his night's rest in; so he laid himself down, meaning to sleep till daylight, and then find his way home to his father and mother.
"No; omnibus," the little man answered readily enough.
"Exactly so!" declared the little man, rubbing his hands together as if it pleased him.
He turned his head and favored the little man with a look of cold inquiry.
"Come, come," said the Little Man, "do not lose time over a donkey that can weep.
"Unless the little man in the plaid mackintosh poured it into the coffee with the milk," she said, "I could not possibly have imbibed it, for I haven't spoken to another soul since we left."
"But the little man cried to me to run, and indeed I thought it was a good observe, and ran.