literature

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lit·er·a·ture

(lit'tĕr-ă-chūr),
1. Body of written work on a specific topic.
2. Colloquial usage indicating any printed matter on a given topic (that is, manufacturer's literature).
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]

literature

As used by doctors, the body of information on which the science of medicine is based.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, LITT ruh t’your
Medspeak-US: pronounced, litter ruh churr

lit·er·a·ture

(lit'ĕr-ă-chŭr)
A body of written material.
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current postcolonial, postmodern and post 9/11 world, the teaching of literature has assumed a new multidimensional role in making up the minds of the individuals, especially in the countries like Pakistan, that have taken much of the effect of the aftermaths of the above said "posts".
The word "crisis" has shadowed Comparative Literature during the course of the development of the discipline for the past hundred years since its birth.
Establishing a difference between Commonwealth and Postcolonial Literature can also be done from the angle of the concerns of both literatures, especially, in reclaiming spaces and places.
A denotative meaning of the term "Sinophone," as used by Sau-ling Wong in her work on Sinophone Chinese American literature to designate Chinese American literature written in Sinitic languages, is a productive way to start the investigation of the notion in terms of its connotative meanings.
In 1989, as the theory wars over deconstruction and poststructuralism were beginning to ease up, Harvard University Press published A New History of French Literature. Edited by Denis Hollier, the volume did away with the traditional taxonomies of literary movements and writers by organizing itself as one long series of dates, each of which testified to a signal moment in French literary history.
BIBR commemorates Haiti's history in the following articles, reflecting on its literature and culture.
The essays are divided into three sections--"African American Literature," "Afro-Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Literature," and "African Literatures in English." As is often the case when conference papers are gathered and revised for publication, there is not much scholarly depth in Contemporary Literature in the African Diaspora.
"It is with a conscious awareness of the need for an introductory work for a general, non-specialist readership that I have written this book," states Roger Allen in his well-written and thoroughly researched volume on Arabic literature. In The Arabic Literary Heritage, Allen provides the general reader with a highly digestible and extremely useful account of an otherwise intractable, if not quite unmanageable, field of discourse.
Mapping World Literature: International Canonization and Transnational Literatures.
The transition from world literature = Western literature to world literature = the literatures of most of the world was remarkably sudden.