literature

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lit·er·a·ture

(lit'tĕr-ă-chūr),
1. Body of written work on a specific topic.
2. Colloquial usage indicating any printed matter on a given topic (that is, manufacturer's literature).
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]

literature

As used by doctors, the body of information on which the science of medicine is based.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, LITT ruh t’your
Medspeak-US: pronounced, litter ruh churr

lit·er·a·ture

(lit'ĕr-ă-chŭr)
A body of written material.
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]

literature,

n the entire body of writings on a given subject.
literature, dental,
n the entire body of writing on dentistry. Most specifically, those writings published following a referee process to validate the scientific discipline in which the writings were produced.
References in periodicals archive ?
The crisis of Comparative Literature originated from the American scholar Wellek.
New literary category discovered in the Nordic region" appeared earlier this week, after literary scholar Olli LE[micro]ytty's presentation on the publication of Ahmed Al-Nawas's report " View of the Conditions of Arabic Literature in the Nordic Region ":
Commonwealth Literature is certainly incomparable to other literatures such as the English, American, French, African, and the Caribbean, just to name these.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: English (ACARA 2009) deines literature as:
Sharing the Sinitic script does not automatically make every work of literature a part of "Chinese" literature, just as the sharing of the Arabic script in the Arab world of over 20 countries does not make all literatures belong to one national literature.
The transition from world literature = Western literature to world literature = the literatures of most of the world was remarkably sudden.
Fifteen years later, A New History of German Literature uses the same structure of momentous dates and subjective critical perspectives to similar effect and gain.
Haitian literature, like the country's politics, was once so dominated by men that outside observers might have believe that it women harbored no philosophical ideals, political ambitions or love for the written word.
The American people find it difficult to believe in the assimilative power of their own culture, including the language and the literature.
Reader-response criticism and terms such as "interpretive community" are but one aspect of how literary theory can inform the teaching of literatures and cultures.
The third section of Contemporary Literature in the African Diaspora, "African Literatures in English," begins, curiously, with a discussion of Mariama Ba's Une si longue lettre, which is in English only by virtue of its having been translated from the original French, and is not considered part of Anglophone African literature, as the title of this section implies.
To that end, he applauds the scholarship of such pioneers as Goldziher, Nicholson, Gibb, Blachere, Huart, Brockelmann, and Nallino, among others, who helped bring Arabic literary texts to the attention of the western reader, and whose works clearly delineated the significant role that literature has consistently played in Arab society.