remains

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remains

(rĭ-mānz′)
pl.n.
1. All that is left after other parts have been taken away, used up, or destroyed.
2. A dead body or parts of a dead body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Landon, 'The Female Portrait Gallery', in Laman Blanchard, The Life and Literary Remains of L.
The failures point beyond the unfinished novel toward a third strategy only intimated in Musil's literary remains.
14) Reprinted in Edward VI, Literary Remains, 1:cclxxviii-ccciii.
This reprint of Petrushevskaya's 1992 novel purports to present Anna's literary remains, dubbed "Notes from the edge of the table.
Anyway, she did walk me in there and showed me his literary remains and then, speaking of the novel, said, "Beginning, middle, and end.
The profusion of metres and poetic forms used, as well as the traveler's descriptions of epic and poetic performances in Multan, make the poem an important document from a period whose literary remains lie largely undiscovered and unedited in manuscript archives.
Nevertheless, his whole method relies on inferring autobiographical elements in these literary remains.
The use of material from witnesses, the libro cerimoniale of Florence and the literary remains, all give a vitality to this material which brings those fifteenth-century moments truly alive.
had access to Peterson's literary remains in Turin.
In 1883 he published a two-volume work entitled The Life, Letters and Literary Remains of Edward Bulwer, Lord Lytton.
But given the enormous objective of the project, namely, to study a musical culture spanning a millennium, to accommodate its archaeological and literary remains, to speculate in the cavernous spaces that exist between isolated and fragmented bits of actual music, and to do so in the span of four hundred pages is probably an impossible task unless at least some aspects and areas receive only cursory treatment.
It is the first attempt for almost three-quarters of a century to provide a scientific treatment of Jewish liturgical history from its origins down to the twentieth century, and self-evidently the first ever to apply to that history the methods and perspectives which have emerged in recent decades in the interpretation of Jewish literary remains from ancient, and not so ancient, times.