spondylolisthesis

(redirected from Listhesis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Listhesis: Retrolisthesis

spondylolisthesis

 [spon″dĭ-lo-lis-the´sis]
forward displacement of a vertebra over a lower segment due to a congenital defect or fracture in the pars interarticularis, usually of the fifth lumbar over the sacrum, or of the fourth lumbar over the fifth. adj., adj spondylolisthet´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spon·dy·lo·lis·the·sis

(spon'di-lō-lis-thē'sis), [MIM*184200]
Forward movement of the body of one of the lower lumbar vertebrae on the vertebra below it, or on the sacrum.
Synonym(s): spondyloptosis
[spondylo- + G. olisthēsis, a slipping and falling]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spondylolisthesis

(spŏn′dl-ō-lĭs-thē′sĭs)
n.
Forward displacement of one of the lower lumbar vertebrae over the vertebra below it or on the sacrum.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spondylolisthesis

Orthopedics The forward slippage of a lumbar vertebra on the vertebra inferior thereto, which usually involves lumbar vertebra, most often at the level between the 5th lumbar vertebra and the 1st sacral vertebra; ranges from mild to severe Etiology Congenital defect in 5th lumbar vertebra, stress fractures, traumatic fractures, bone diseases; it may be associated with and produce lordosis Clinical Low back pain and pain in thighs and buttocks, stiffness, muscle tightness, tenderness in slipped area, paresthesias, sciatica due to nerve root compression
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·te·ro·lis·the·sis

(an'tĕr-ō-lis'thĕ-sis)
Forward displacement of a vertebral body with respect to the vertebral body immediately below it, due to congenital anomaly, degenerative change, or trauma.
Synonym(s): spondylolisthesis.
[antero- + G. olisthēsis, a slipping]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

spondylolisthesis

The moving forwards of a vertebra relative to the one under it, most commonly of the 5th lumbar vertebra over the top of the SACRUM. This is due to a congenital weakness (SPONDYLOLYSIS) of the bony arch that bears the facets by which the vertebrae articulate together. Spondylolisthesis causes severe backache on standing and leads to nerve pressure effects. The condition may also affect vertebrae in the neck.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Degenerative lumbar listhesis and bone mineral density in elderly women.
After the administration of general anaesthesia, the patient is placed on Rolton-Hall frame in prone on the operating table with hips in as much neutral as possible (An attempt to reduce the listhesis) and knees in flexion (To prevent undue stretching of nerve roots).
Jacobs et al reviewed the outcome of 684 trails and selectively included 29 studies in their meta-analysis to determine which fusion technique achieved the best clinical and radiological results in adult patients with low-grade listhesis; 8 randomized controlled studies, 4 prospective and 17 retrospective case studies, fusion was found to be superior to non-operative treatment for low-grade listhesis.
In conclusion, pedicular screw rod system with posterolumbar fusion with bone substitute is safe, promising and appealing technique, especially in low-grade listhesis. Early post-operative pain relief, availability, sterility and reduced morbidity favours bone substitutes over autogenous bone graft.
We had 55% of patients with Grade I listhesis and 45% had Grade II listhesis.
No patients were found to have Grade III or Grade IV listhesis. Similar findings were reported by Mostafa Fathy et al.
* Reduction of listhesis of grade I and II is not necessary for better relief.
Study done by Fain Gold et al found spondylolysis and listhesis as most common cause of back pain in young population.