Listeria

(redirected from Listeria infections)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Listeria

 [lis-tēr´e-ah]
a genus of gram-positive bacteria (family Corynebacterium). L. monocyto´genes causes listeriosis.

Listeria

(lis-tēr'ē-ă),
A genus of aerobic to microaerophilic, motile, peritrichous bacteria containing small, coccoid, gram-positive rods; these organisms tend to produce chains of 3-5 cells and, in the rough state, elongated and filamentous forms. Cells 18-24 hours old may show a palisade arrangement with a few V or Y forms; the bacteria produce acid but no gas from glucose and are found in the feces of humans and other animals, on vegetation, and in silage and are parasitic on poikilothermic and warm-blooded animals, including humans. The type species is Listeria monocytogenes.
[Joseph Lister]

listeria

(lĭ-stîr′ē-ə)
n.
Any of various rod-shaped, gram-positive bacteria of the genus Listeria, which includes the causative agent of listeriosis.

Lis·ter·i·a

(lis-tēr'ē-ă)
A genus of aerobic to microaerophilic motile bacteria (family Corynebacteriaceae) containing small, coccoid, gram-positive rods; found in the feces of humans and other animals, on vegetation, and in silage, and parasitic on poikilothermic and warm-blooded animals, including humans. The type species is L. monocytogenes.

Lister,

Joseph (Lord Lister), English surgeon, 1827-1912.
Listeria - a genus of aerobic to microaerophilic, motile, peritrichous bacteria.
Lister dressing - the first type of antiseptic dressing, one of gauze impregnated with carbolic acid.
Lister forceps
Lister knife
Lister method - antiseptic surgery as first advocated by Lister in 1867. Synonym(s): listerism
Lister scissors
Lister tubercle - a small prominence on the dorsal aspect of the distal end of the radius that serves as a trochlea or pulley for the tendon. Synonym(s): dorsal tubercle of radius
Listerella - in bacteriology, a rejected generic name sometimes cited as a synonym of Listeria; the type species is Listerella hepatolytica.
Listerine - antiseptic mouthwash.
listerism - Synonym(s): Lister method

Lis·ter·i·a

(lis-tēr'ē-ă)
Genus of aerobic tomicroaerophilic, motile, peritrichous bacteria containing small, coccoid, gram-positive rods; found in the feces of humans and other animals, on vegetation, and in silage. The type species is L. monocytogenes.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of the cases of listeria infection were in hospital patients in England.
While medical students and residents are still taught to think of Listeria infection as one of the "big three" causes of neonatal sepsis along with group B streptococcus and Escherichia coli, many pediatricians have never seen a case of this rare, but potentially devastating disease.
He said he could one day foresee the development of a pill or probiotic drink that could be given to at-risk patients to minimize the risk of Listeria infection.
coli O157 infections linked to spinach (34), and the outbreak of Listeria infections linked to cantaloupe (15).
About 10 percent of serious listeria infections involve a cardiac infection, according to Nancy Freitag, principle investigator on the study.
([section]) Current Healthy People 2010 objective 10-1 targets for incidence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157, and Listeria infections, and HUS.
Declines in the four major food-borne illnesses were most dramatic in 2000, with declines of 27% in Campylobacter infections, 35% in Listeria infections, 15% in Salmonella infections, and 21% in Escherichia coli 0157.
Pets that develop Salmonella and Listeria infections can become lethargic, have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.
Professor Hill explains how his group's work could help reduce the incidence of Listeria infections.
The l-month lag reflects delays between food production and consumption plus the known long incubation of listeria infections. Similar lags have been observed for other enteric pathogens (6,11).
In 2006, the incidence of Listeria infections remained higher than at its lowest point in 2002.
Listeria infections are more common during pregnancy; one quarter to one third of all cases of listeriosis occur in pregnant women (16,17).