tarsometatarsal joints

(redirected from Lisfranc joints)

tar·so·met·a·tar·sal joints

[TA]
the three synovial joints between the tarsal and metatarsal bones, consisting of a medial joint between the first cuneiform and first metatarsal, an intermediate joint between the second and third cuneiforms and corresponding metatarsals, and a lateral joint between the cuboid and fourth and fifth metatarsals.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tar·so·met·a·tar·sal joints

(tahr'sō-met'ă-tahr'săl joynts) [TA]
The three synovial articulations between the tarsal and metatarsal bones, consisting of a medial joint between the first cuneiform and first metatarsal, an intermediate joint between the second and third cuneiforms and corresponding metatarsals, and a lateral joint between the cuboid and fourth and fifth metatarsals.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Lisfranc,

Jacques, French surgeon, 1790-1847.
Lisfranc amputation - amputation of the foot at the tarsometatarsal joint, the sole being preserved to make the flap. Synonym(s): Lisfranc operation
Lisfranc dislocation
Lisfranc fracture
Lisfranc joints - the three synovial joints between the tarsal and metatarsal bones. Synonym(s): tarsometatarsal joints
Lisfranc ligaments - ligaments that pass from the cuneiform bones to the metatarsals, the one from the first cuneiform to the second metatarsal being the strongest. Synonym(s): interosseous cuneometatarsal ligaments
Lisfranc operation - Synonym(s): Lisfranc amputation
scalene tubercle of Lisfranc - a small spine on the inner edge of the first rib, giving attachment to the scalenus anterior muscle. Synonym(s): scalene tubercle
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Sprains--residual instability of subtalar, Lisfranc joints, and turf toe.
Often the diagnosis of a midfoot sprain is made, and persistent subtle Lisfranc joint tenderness may be noted.
Subsequent arthritis in the second tarsometatarsal joint and Lisfranc joint often seen after screw fixation (8) can be career ending.
This population predictably places higher demands on the Lisfranc joint due to the rigor of their activities.
However, biomechanical studies have shown that measurable motion occurs at the Lisfranc joint in the intact, physiologic state.
It may also provide the benefit of restoration of physiologic motion across the Lisfranc joint.
Outcome after open reduction and internal fixation of Lisfranc joint injuries.
Stability of Lisfranc joints in ballet pointe position.
(17) It can lead to instability and progressive disorganization of the Lisfranc joint. Additionally, there can be loss of the medial longitudinal arch.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the pointe shoe and the tarsometatarsal ligaments in Lisfranc joint stability en pointe.