Lisch nodule

(redirected from Lisch nodules)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Lisch nodules: Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Lisch nod·ule

(lish),
iris hamartomas typically seen in type 1 neurofibromatosis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Lisch nod·ule

(lish nod'yūl)
Iris hamartomas typically seen in association with type 1 neurofibromatosis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Lisch nodule

(lish)
[Karl Lisch, Ger. scientist, 1907–1999]
A melanocytic hamartoma projecting from the surface of the iris of the eye. It is a well-defined, dome-shaped elevation that is clear to yellow or brown. These growths, which do not cause ophthalmological complications, may be seen without magnification, but examination with use of a slit lamp is needed to differentiate them from nevi of the iris. Lisch nodules are found only in patients with neurofibromatosis, type 1.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Lisch,

Karl, Austrian ophthalmologist, 1907-1999.
Lisch nodule - iris hamartomas typically seen in type 1 neurofibromatosis. Synonym(s): Sakurai-Lisch nodule
Sakurai-Lisch nodule - Synonym(s): Lisch nodule

Sakurai,

Japanese ophthalmologist.
Sakurai-Lisch nodule - Synonym(s): Lisch nodule
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas cafe au lait (80-95%), Iris Lisch nodules (66.9%) and peripheral neurofibromas (49%) were reported in other studies.
The presence of Lisch nodules is unique to NF1 and is best seen by slit lamp biomicroscopy examined in ophthalmic department.
Other investigations should include pure-tone audiometry to exclude bilateral neural hearing loss, an ophthalmologic examination to look for Lisch nodules (iris hamartoma), CT or MRI of the head and neck to search for other tumors (e.g., glioma, meningioma, and astrocytoma), and abdominal scanning for pheochromocytoma.
Lisch nodules [Figure 3) can be easily seen by slit lamp examination, by focusing on the anterioT surface of the iris.
Lisch nodules are pigmented hamartomatous naevus, (11) which occur from proliferation of melanocytes and fibroblasts.
Neurofibrosarcoma is a rare neoplasm that may arise independently or in association with neurofibromatosis; it is one of the most lethal diseases.[15] Sarcomatous degeneration of neurofibromas is accompanied by a characteristic inflammatory response including erythema, warmth, and pain.[4] Lisch nodules (dome-shaped, pigmented nodules of the iris) are present in over 90% of type 1 patients by the age of 5 years.[16] Other optic manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1 include optic glioma and sphenoid wing dysplasia.
Detailed examination of the patient for the evidence of Neurofibromatosis revealed no neurofibromas in other locations, no "cafe au lait" spots, Lisch nodules, axillary or inguinal freckling, sphenoid wing dysplasia or thinning of the cortex of long bone, and optic glioma.
Hamartomas of the iris (melanocytic nevi) can be seen and are called Lisch nodules. They are variable in size and have a smooth, dome-shaped configuration.
These mamillations develop into Lisch nodules with the advancement of age.
NF1, an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder, is commonly identified by the development of cafe-au-lait pigmentation of the skin, axillary freckling, optic nerve gliomas, Lisch nodules, distinctive bone lesions, and cutaneous or subcutaneous tumors called neurofibromas (1).
Consultation with ophthalmologist found no Lisch nodule (iris hamartoma).