liquid crystal

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liquid crystal

A substance that alters its color or changes from opaque to transparent when subjected to changes in temperature, electric current, pressure, or electromagnetic waves, or when impurities are present. Liquid crystals have been used to detect temperature fluctuation in infants and may be divided into two general classes: cholestric, which change color; and nematic, which can change back and forth from transparent to opaque.
See also: crystal
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References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of coating the top of the liquid crystal, the links slipped into the fluid and connected with each other on the glass slide.
In summary, voltage-controllable guided channels are formed in a planar nematic liquid crystals cell.
Fernandez, "Microstrip device for broadband (15-65 GHz) measurement of dielectric properties of nematic liquid crystals," IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, vol.
"Our university has a strong track record of world-leading research in liquid crystals. Its academics have a growing reputation for inventing applications for liquid crystals way beyond the technology familiar to most of us through flat screen monitors."
The strongest and most convincing parts of Leslie's book, in this regard, are those that revolve around the history of scientific work and technological applications of liquid crystals. The author tells us, in this context, the fascinating and little-known story of how the faculty of liquid crystal to convert heat into visible patterns of various colours opened up the opportunity of using them in media devices.
Meniscus and dislocations in free-standing films of smectic A liquid crystals. Phys Rev Lett 1997; 78: 1924.
The study has made computer models of colloidal suspensions in liquid crystals subjected to electrical fields modulated over time.
Nematic liquid crystals (NLC) molecules exhibit directional order, but are otherwise randomly positioned with fluidic properties.
ATS provides a choice of TLC-100 liquid crystals formulated to respond visually to specific temperatures.
The incorporation of liquid crystals in photopolymers makes it possible to obtain composite materials which can vary their optical properties by means of an electric field.
Physics, electronics, mathematics, and information are among the fields of contributors who review recent research into spatial (rather than temporal) solitons in nematic liquid crystals, where they display unique qualities.
However, their widespread use only came about after a team of researchers at the University of Hull led by Professor George Gray, FRS, CBE developed a form of liquid crystals.