lipid raft

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lipid raft

(lip'id raft),
Detergent-insoluble raft microdomains that are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, found in the plasma membrane, late secretory pathway, and endosomal compartments.

lipid raft

A tiny cholesterol-rich region on a cell membrane that helps selected molecules enter the cytoplasm.
Synonym: lipid domain
See also: raft
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References in periodicals archive ?
These cells--originally derived from a human-prostate cancer and containing prostasome membranes enriched in lipid rafts of cholesterol and sphingomyelin (Llorente et al.
On the other hand, a hierarchical model of two dimensional PM organization has been proposed including transient confinement in membrane-actin-skeleton induced compartments and lipid rafts.
Too much cholesterol increases the abundance of lipid rafts, areas in the plasma membrane where surface receptors initiate signaling events leading to angiogenesis," Miller said.
To see if the two toxin forms showed a tendency to associate with distinct membrane bilayer domains such as lipid rafts (22), the fractions were also monitored for both cholesterol and neutral sugars (data not shown).
They cover isolation techniques, structural analysis, lipid rafts, lipid trafficking and profiling, biomarkers, lipid peroxidation, biostatistics applied to lipids, software tools, and bioinformatics.
2008) Lipid rafts determine clustering of STIM1 in endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions and regulation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE).
Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids (Karp, 2005).
Moreover, cholesterol, a main component of lipid rafts (Pike 2004), regulates BK channel sensitivity to alcohol.
2]-adrenergic receptors do indeed preassociate in clusters supported by intercellular lipid rafts known as caveolae.
Hildreth's research has been focused on the role of lipid rafts, adhesion molecules, and the exosome release pathway in the biology of human retroviruses (HIV).
Dr Eric Freed, principal investigator in molecular biology at the American National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told the Wall Street Journal, "It adds another human pathogen to the growing list of viruses that use lipid rafts.
Nabi's lab is focused on the cell biology of cancer; he studies a number of cellular domains including lipid rafts and caveolae, the endoplasmic reticulum, focal adhesions, and tumor cell pseudopodia.