linoleic acid

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linoleic acid

 [lin″o-le´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id), Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
9,12-Octadecadienoic acid; a doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides, that is essential in nutrition in mammals.
Synonym(s): linolic acid
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

linoleic acid

(lĭn′ə-lē′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C18H32O2, that is considered essential to the human diet. It is an important component of drying oils, such as linseed oil.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

linoleic acid

An essential 18-carbon fatty acid with two unsaturated bonds which derived from plant oils.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id) Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
Doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides; essential in nutrition in mammals.
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

linoleic acid

The principle fatty acid in plant seed oils. An essential polyunsaturated fatty acid, interconvertible with LINOLENIC ACID and arachidonic acid and needed for cell membranes and the synthesis of PROSTAGLANDINS. It is plentiful in vegetable fats. Essential fatty acid dietary deficiency is rare.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

linoleic acid

or

essential fatty acid

an unsaturated fatty acid that cannot be synthesized in the human body and is therefore described as ‘essential’. Deficiency of linoleic acid in the diet results in increased metabolic activity, failure in growth and even death.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The values of linoleic acid in different analyzed nuts were represented as 57.26 g/100g in walnut, 48.19 g/100g in pine nuts, 37.06 g/100g in peanut, 33.25 g/100g in pistachio and 30.14 g/100g in almond.
The team also found rat mothers who ate a diet high in high linoleic had a reduced number of male babies.
The researchers fed rats for 10 weeks on a diet with high linoleic acid, mated them and then investigated the effects of the diet on their pregnancy and developing babies.
The FAD2 gene family which encode the enzymes 1-acyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3phosphocholine delta 12-desaturases (FAD2) are responsible for the production of linoleic acid from oleic acid in oilseeds plants.
Chemical preparation.--The "necromones" tested in the learning assay were oleic acid (Sigma-Aldrich cat# 364525), linoleic acid (Sigma-Aldrich cat# L1626), and ethanol extracts of adult cricket corpses.
The study backs up findings from earlier population-based studies that have linked a higher dietary intake of linoleic acid and a higher blood linoleic acid level to a lower risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes, without increasing the risk of cancer, for example.
Oleic acid has weak polar properties (similar to linoleic acid), whereas lauric acid has a strong polarity.
Liu, "Effectiveness ofoils rich in linoleic and linolenic acids to enhance conjugated linoleic acid in milk from dairy cows," Journal of Dairy Science, vol.
Nearly 90% of sunflower oil consists of unsaturated fatty acids, mostly oleic acid (18: 1) and linoleic acid (18: 2).
Reheating of fats and oils should be avoided.7 For ensuring this appropriate balance of fatty acids in cereal-based diets, it is necessary to increase the a-linolenic (n-3) acid intake and reduce the quantity of linoleic (n-6) acid obtained from the cooking oil.
Linoleic acid is present in a lot of processed foods, such as potato chips, salad dressing, and packaged sandwich meats.