linker

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link·er

(link'ĕr),
A fragment of synthetic DNA containing a restriction site that may be used for splicing genes.

link·er

(lingk'ĕr)
A fragment of synthetic DNA containing a restriction site that may be used for splicing genes.

linker

  1. a synthetic double-stranded OLIGONUCLEOTIDE, containing a sequence for a specific RESTRICTION ENZYME. A linker is used to attach COHESIVE ENDS to a DNA MOLECULE that has BLUNT ENDS, for use, for example, in GENE CLONING.
  2. DNA contained in a NUCLEOSOME that is not directly complexed with the HISTONES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mersana's solid IP position provides a comprehensive ADC solution for the company's internal pipeline and for the programmes of its partners, by covering proprietary payloads, Fleximer polymer linker technology and conjugation to antibodies or antibody alternatives, chief business officer, Eva Jack, commented.
Conjugation of R-PE to a reduced antibody by SMCC linker:
Sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(A-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC) (Sigma-Aldrich, Wisconsin, USA) is a water-soluble heterobifunctional linker. It contains an amine-reactive A-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS ester) and a sulfhydryl-reactive maleimide group.
Conjugation of thiolated PE to the antibody by SPDP linker
Tandem scFv: Tandem scFv (taFv) is produced by connecting two scFv molecules through a short linker. This format has a very flexible structure and is the simplest to be generated.
Countering claims that solid-phase organic synthesis died with its champion Robert Bruce Merrifield in 2006, scientists from North America, Europe, and China introduce the technique and the earlier traditional linker units, then explore the current state-of-the-art multifunctional linker units that are being applied in diversity-oriented synthesis, chemical genetics, focused library preparation, and other growing fields.
By attaching a cell-killing drug to the antibody through a stable linker that releases the drug inside tumor cells but not in the bloodstream, it is possible to achieve dramatic antitumor activity.
"It is very important to utilize serum-stable linker systems when delivering potent, cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells via monoclonal antibodies.