linkage

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linkage

 [lingk´ij]
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.

link·age

(lingk'ăj),
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

/link·age/ (lingk´ij)
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.
3. in psychology, the connection between a stimulus and its response.

linkage

(lĭng′kĭj)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of linking.
b. The condition of being linked.
2. A connection or relation; an association.
3. A negotiating policy of making agreement on one issue dependent on progress toward another objective.
4. A system of interconnected machine elements, such as rods, springs, and pivots, used to transmit power or motion.
5. Electricity A measure of the induced voltage in a circuit caused by a magnetic flux and equal to the flux times the number of turns in the coil that surrounds it.
6. Genetics An association between two or more genes such that the traits they control tend to be inherited together.

linkage

[ling′kij]
Etymology: Gk, linke, connection
1 (in genetics) the location of two or more genes on the same chromosome so that they do not segregate independently during meiosis but tend to be transmitted together as a unit. The closer the loci of the genes, the more likely they are to be inherited as a group and associated with a specific trait, whereas the farther apart they are, the greater the chance that they will be separated by crossing over and carried on homologous chromosomes. The concept of linkage, which opposes the independent assortment theory of mendelian genetics, led to the foundation of the modern chromosome theory of genetics. See also synteny.
2 (in psychology) the association between a stimulus and the response it elicits.
3 (in chemistry) the bond between two atoms in a chemical compound or the lines used to designate valency connections between the atoms in structural formulas.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

1. The location of genes on the same CHROMOSOME so that the characteristics they determine tend to remain associated.
2. The tendency of genes to remain together during recombination. This is proportional to their proximity to each other. Sex linkage simply implies that the particular gene is located on an X or a Y chromosome.
3. The force that holds atoms together in a molecule.

linkage,

n 1. in genetics, the location of two genes on the same chromosome such that they are typically transmitted as a cohesive unit during meiosis.
2. in psychology, the relationship between a response and its stimulus.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. Form of connection between and among things.

linkage (ling´kəj),

n the connection between two or more objects. In computer programming, coding that connects two separately coded routines.
linkage, cross,
linkage, sex,
n the inheritance of certain characteristics that are determined by genes located in the sex chromosomes.

linkage

1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulae. See also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having located on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance (linkage disequilibrium). Called also syntenic group.

disequilibrium linkage
the inheritance of two alleles together at a higher than expected frequency.
linkage map
see genetic map.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the novel linkages, a methylene methyl imino linkage, abbreviated as "MMI," has shown highly attractive drug properties in cell culture and is slated to be tested in animals in 1995.
The Linkages data collection system was integrated into the CCMT.
Genetic linkage maps are powerful research tools for the study of many organisms (Dib et al.
The fifth linkage that exists between the amino acid chains is Van der Waal's forces, which are weak molecular cross bonds that are relatively unimportant when working with hair.
This finding has been attributed to the limited number and/or intensity of linkages formed by different types of foreign affiliates in different host economy contexts (McIntyre et al.
The new model is then applied to the real estate sector of seven selected OECD countries and the linkages are re-calculated and re-measured in order to explore appropriately the impact of the real estate sector.
This legislation creates a badly needed linkage between a successful public health program and Medicaid that will ensure a seamless system of care for women found to have this life threatening illness.
The Linkages program, a case management approach to assist older and dependent adults to remain in their homes, provides a framework for integrating home and community-based services.
This list of terms provides the source for intermediate linkages (B) between A and C.
I contend that, if we are truly an organization that holds high standards for all professions, we will be valued even more in the future for the linkages and support we give the needed expertise in this emerging picture.
The rubber to filler linkages are chemical bonds between the elastomer and the carbon black.
The concepts of gross and net linkages are introduced and the analysis is extended to both current (flow) and capital (stock) accounts.