linkage

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linkage

 [lingk´ij]
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.

link·age

(lingk'ăj),
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

/link·age/ (lingk´ij)
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.
3. in psychology, the connection between a stimulus and its response.

linkage

(lĭng′kĭj)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of linking.
b. The condition of being linked.
2. A connection or relation; an association.
3. A negotiating policy of making agreement on one issue dependent on progress toward another objective.
4. A system of interconnected machine elements, such as rods, springs, and pivots, used to transmit power or motion.
5. Electricity A measure of the induced voltage in a circuit caused by a magnetic flux and equal to the flux times the number of turns in the coil that surrounds it.
6. Genetics An association between two or more genes such that the traits they control tend to be inherited together.

linkage

[ling′kij]
Etymology: Gk, linke, connection
1 (in genetics) the location of two or more genes on the same chromosome so that they do not segregate independently during meiosis but tend to be transmitted together as a unit. The closer the loci of the genes, the more likely they are to be inherited as a group and associated with a specific trait, whereas the farther apart they are, the greater the chance that they will be separated by crossing over and carried on homologous chromosomes. The concept of linkage, which opposes the independent assortment theory of mendelian genetics, led to the foundation of the modern chromosome theory of genetics. See also synteny.
2 (in psychology) the association between a stimulus and the response it elicits.
3 (in chemistry) the bond between two atoms in a chemical compound or the lines used to designate valency connections between the atoms in structural formulas.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

1. The location of genes on the same CHROMOSOME so that the characteristics they determine tend to remain associated.
2. The tendency of genes to remain together during recombination. This is proportional to their proximity to each other. Sex linkage simply implies that the particular gene is located on an X or a Y chromosome.
3. The force that holds atoms together in a molecule.

linkage,

n 1. in genetics, the location of two genes on the same chromosome such that they are typically transmitted as a cohesive unit during meiosis.
2. in psychology, the relationship between a response and its stimulus.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. Form of connection between and among things.

linkage (ling´kəj),

n the connection between two or more objects. In computer programming, coding that connects two separately coded routines.
linkage, cross,
linkage, sex,
n the inheritance of certain characteristics that are determined by genes located in the sex chromosomes.

linkage

1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulae. See also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having located on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance (linkage disequilibrium). Called also syntenic group.

disequilibrium linkage
the inheritance of two alleles together at a higher than expected frequency.
linkage map
see genetic map.
References in periodicals archive ?
Strengthening of linkages between CSC and the Taiwan government.
The potential of foreign linkages as a means of establishing Philippine firms to the global value chain and market, as well as ensuring that domestic firms will continue to compete and innovate, are key points that can be contributed by this study,' authors Francis Mark A.
This article proposes a novel linkage method for hierarchical clustering, named k-Linkage.
The Linkages data collection system was integrated into the CCMT.
Construction of a linkage map requires a large number of molecular markers.
Where firm level linkages are the focus, empirical investigation is usually limited to econometric studies using panel data and input/output tables (Girma et al.
In the context of input-output tables, the linkages can be categorized into two groups according to the direction of interdependencies.
The phenotypes are difficult to define, although recently there has been a huge increase in mapping of Mendelian as well as complex traits using two methods: gene linkage, which can examine the entire genome, and genetic association, which starts with a candidate gene or a set of genes.
In order to do accurate record- linkage, the data fields necessary to perform the linkage, typically individual identifiers, must be accurate and in a standardized format across all the data sets to be linked.
Oligonucleotides are provided that have methylene(methylimino) linkages alternating with phosphorothioate or phosphodiester linkages.
A weaker attack on linkages is that the United States is not without sweatshops, child labor, crony capitalism, congested hog pens, eggs produced by hens in cramped batteries, toxic waste, clear cutting of forests, etc.
To learn about how subject matter changes over time, a recent study grouped the articles by decades and a percentage was determined for each decade group based on linkages to 478 word roots.