competence

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Related to Linguistic competence: Linguistic performance, Communicative competence

competence

 [kom´pĕ-tens]
1. a principle of professional practice, identifying the ability of the provider to administer safe and reliable care on a consistent basis.
2. the ability of a patient to manage activities of daily living.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tents),
1. The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. In psychiatry, an antidote to certain types of anxiety.
3. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
4. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
5. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
6. In psychiatry, the mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
7. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli.
[Fr. competence, fr. L.L. competentia, congruity]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

competence

(kŏm′pĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The ability to do something well or efficiently.
b. A range of skill or ability: a task beyond his competence.
c. A specific ability or skill: a surprising competence in dealing with animals.
2. Law The quality or condition of being legally qualified or fit to perform an act.
3. Microbiology The ability of bacteria to be genetically transformable.
4. Medicine The ability to respond immunologically to bacteria, viruses, or other antigenic agents.
5. Linguistics The knowledge that enables one to speak and understand a language.
6. Sufficient means for a comfortable existence.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

competence

Medspeak
The ability to effectively perform the activities of a particular occupation (or role) to the standards expected.

Psychiatry
A legally determined capability to act on one's own behalf.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

competence

Patient's rights A legal term for the capacity of a person to act on his/her own behalf; the ability to understand information presented, to appreciate the consequences of acting–or not acting–on that information, and to make a choice. See Autonomy. Cf Incapacity, Incompetence Psychology A constellation of abilities possessed by a person for adequate decision-making; competency is a measure of a person's autonomy and ability to give permission for diagnostic tests or for dangerous, but potentially life-saving procedures. Cf Autonomy Vox populi Skill, ability. See Cultural competence.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
1. The quality of being skilled or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
3. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
4. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
5. psychiatry The mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
6. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli. Sometimes called competency.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

competence

  1. a period when a differentiating cell or tissue is capable of switching to an alternative developmental PATHWAY. See INDUCTION, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, GENE SWITCHING, CANALIZATION.
  2. a state in bacteria when they are able to receive DNA from other bacteria in a process called TRANSFORMATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about competence

Q. Would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the olympics? I am a shuttle relay state champion. I won many cups in state and country level. My long-time-goal is to have my name at least on the Olympics list. But here is a new problem to spoil my goal. I am diagnosed as bipolar-I. Now my worry is would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the Olympics? Or will I be able to compete in the Special Olympics?

A. wow...good question...can mental health patient be a special Olympic athletes. i think you should check it out with simple phone call, here is how to locate a special Olympics Program near you:
http://info.specialolympics.org/Special+Olympics+Public+Website/English/Program_Locator/default.htm

More discussions about competence
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References in periodicals archive ?
They have in common three of the categories: British Studies content, Linguistic competences, and Pragmatic competences; thus, the similarities of the rubrics allow for comparison and contrast of the results.
It is essential that future studies are experimental in nature and replicate the data collection and analyses conducted here with both experimental and comparison groups in order to infer with greater confidence that growth in English linguistic competence can be attributed to the instruction provided.
Linguistic competence. Participants at both sites frequently referenced the high number of Spanish-speaking staff as an important component of patient-centered care: "It seems that most people at the clinic are bilingual, in Spanish and English.
One of them is an indicator for linguistic competence, and the other is for the absence of linguistic competence.
The second kind--originating with Chomsky's work (see especially Chomsky 1995, 2000) and vigorously defended by Collins (2004, 2006, 2007, 2008)-- involves a more substantial departure from PAV, since it denies that linguistic competence involves a cognitive relation to certain kinds of contents.
Thus, while the former actually covers the linguistic competence, the latter refers to the communication competence.
At the end of a semester or year abroad at SIS, the student should begin to develop a variety of competences: linguistic competence (of the socio-linguistic variety), textual competence (that comes from the study of various disciplines), social competence (deriving from the service carried out), global competence and finally intercultural competence, or better yet, reflective intercultural competence.
This means that 4 out of 6 indicators are related to linguistic competence, which may explain the higher score of CLIL students, who have a greater mastery of communicative strategies.
In addition, the 10-week linguistic course appeared to be effective in improving the international nurses' linguistic competence by reducing their phonologic errors significantly.
The question to be addressed then is, even for those that have been accredited to possess some academic competence by the award of the first degree and the subsequent pursuit of a Master's degree in the English language, how well does their performance reflect there academic competence which secondarily translates to linguistic competence in the second language setting?
the socializing role of the teacher, the importance of variation and repetition, and the teacher's linguistic competence and insecurity.
The Jesuit Clooney is uniquely and superbly qualified to undertake this task, rooted as he is within his own ecclesial tradition and transformed by the years he has spent in India wrestling with the Hindu religious heritage, with outstanding linguistic competence and openness to the unveiling of truth wherever it may be found.

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