competence

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Related to Linguistic competence: Linguistic performance, Communicative competence

competence

 [kom´pĕ-tens]
1. a principle of professional practice, identifying the ability of the provider to administer safe and reliable care on a consistent basis.
2. the ability of a patient to manage activities of daily living.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tents),
1. The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. In psychiatry, an antidote to certain types of anxiety.
3. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
4. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
5. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
6. In psychiatry, the mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
7. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli.
[Fr. competence, fr. L.L. competentia, congruity]

competence

(kŏm′pĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The ability to do something well or efficiently.
b. A range of skill or ability: a task beyond his competence.
c. A specific ability or skill: a surprising competence in dealing with animals.
2. Law The quality or condition of being legally qualified or fit to perform an act.
3. Microbiology The ability of bacteria to be genetically transformable.
4. Medicine The ability to respond immunologically to bacteria, viruses, or other antigenic agents.
5. Linguistics The knowledge that enables one to speak and understand a language.
6. Sufficient means for a comfortable existence.

competence

[kom′pətəns]
Etymology: L, competentia, capable
1 (in embryology) the total capacity of an embryonic cell to react to determinative stimuli in various ways of differentiation.
2 the ability of bacteria to take up donor deoxyribonucleic acid molecules.

competence

Medspeak
The ability to effectively perform the activities of a particular occupation (or role) to the standards expected.

Psychiatry
A legally determined capability to act on one's own behalf.

competence

Patient's rights A legal term for the capacity of a person to act on his/her own behalf; the ability to understand information presented, to appreciate the consequences of acting–or not acting–on that information, and to make a choice. See Autonomy. Cf Incapacity, Incompetence Psychology A constellation of abilities possessed by a person for adequate decision-making; competency is a measure of a person's autonomy and ability to give permission for diagnostic tests or for dangerous, but potentially life-saving procedures. Cf Autonomy Vox populi Skill, ability. See Cultural competence.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
1. The quality of being skilled or capable of performing an allotted function.
2. The normal tight closure of a cardiac valve.
3. The ability of a group of embryonic cells to respond to an inducer.
4. The ability of a (bacterial) cell to take up free DNA, which may lead to transformation.
5. psychiatry The mental ability to distinguish right from wrong and to manage one's own affairs, or to assist one's counsel in a legal proceeding.
6. The state of reactivity of a cell, tissue, or organism that allows it to respond to certain stimuli. Sometimes called competency.

competence

  1. a period when a differentiating cell or tissue is capable of switching to an alternative developmental PATHWAY. See INDUCTION, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, GENE SWITCHING, CANALIZATION.
  2. a state in bacteria when they are able to receive DNA from other bacteria in a process called TRANSFORMATION.

competence

the ability to perform a task effectively; perceived competence a person's perception of their general abilities within a given domain, such as in sport in general.

competence,

n the state or condition of being sufficiently qualified to perform a particular action. To achieve this condition, one must possess the proper knowledge, skills, training, and professionalism.

com·pe·tence

(kom'pĕ-tĕns)
The quality of being competent or capable of performing an allotted function.

competence,

n a measure of the degree of a person's ability to cope with all aspects of the environment.

Patient discussion about competence

Q. Would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the olympics? I am a shuttle relay state champion. I won many cups in state and country level. My long-time-goal is to have my name at least on the Olympics list. But here is a new problem to spoil my goal. I am diagnosed as bipolar-I. Now my worry is would people with bipolar disorder be considered eligible to compete in the Olympics? Or will I be able to compete in the Special Olympics?

A. wow...good question...can mental health patient be a special Olympic athletes. i think you should check it out with simple phone call, here is how to locate a special Olympics Program near you:
http://info.specialolympics.org/Special+Olympics+Public+Website/English/Program_Locator/default.htm

More discussions about competence
References in periodicals archive ?
The close alignment of pragmatics and functional communication in the absence of linguistic competence could also be influenced by several other factors including: a) age, b) communicative environment, and c) ability to read and write.
45) See Devitt, supra note 24, at 76 (examining the situation in which someone who has considerable knowledge of a particular subject also has a linguistic competence of that subject but not necessarily the ability to communicate such competence).
In reality, FICCS also represents one of the possible answers to the question raised in the text, Service-Learning Across Cultures: Promise and Achievement (2004), which argues for the systematic evaluation of language acquisition by service-learning students because its results make evident that the combination of spontaneous acquisition (service) plus guided acquisition (learning) produces in the student a level of linguistic competence superior to that attainable in a solely academic context.
Skrivanek has developed its own quality management system in an effort to produce texts with the highest level of linguistic competence for each of the 20 million words translated monthly," said Michal Kufhaber, Global Production Manager at Skrivanek.
The proposed legislation also addresses cultural and linguistic competence training for doctors, nurses, and other clinical staff.
One of Tharp's (1994) instructional principles that characterize cultural compatibility is the development of linguistic competence in the language of instruction.
Yet, the International Council of Nurses has recently published a draft position statement on cultural and linguistic competence that deserves our attention, especially as our knowledge, education, and practice developments are no longer isolated, but, rather, are part of a global nursing initiative.
144-172), discusses a more general issue in linguistics, namely whether linguistic competence is innate or acquired.
suggest that adult learners' FL anxiety derives from "the disparity between the language learner's 'true-self and his/her 'more limited self' as reflected in linguistic competence in FL class (1986: 128).
A one-to-one mode of tutoring is an invaluable asset of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs), as it guarantees fast progress of linguistic competence.
Probably, respondents gave these answers on the assumption that the linguistic competence to handle English is the basic that should be held by their employees as a matter of course.
Chapter three is a positive "Survey of Archaic Myths of the Settled Peoples of the Orient and Occident," an act of courage in the grand style that will surely nettle specialists in a dozen fields, who will at least have to admire Diakonoff's immense reading, linguistic competence, and depth of thought.

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