lingual nerve

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lin·gual nerve

[TA]
one of the branches of the mandibular nerve [CN V3], passing medial to the lateral pterygoid muscle, between the medial pterygoid and the mandible, and beneath the mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth to the side of the tongue over the anterior two thirds of which it is distributed: it also supplies the mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth. It passes close to the lingual side of the roots of the second and third lower molar teeth and is endangered during tooth extractions.
Synonym(s): nervus lingualis [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lin·gual nerve

(ling'gwăl nĕrv) [TA]
One of the branches of the mandibular nerve, passing medially to the lateral pterygoid muscle, between the medial pterygoid and the mandible, and beneath the mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth to the side of the tongue over the anterior two thirds of which it is distributed; it also supplies the mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth. It passes close to the lingual side of the roots of the second and third lower molar teeth and is endangered during tooth extractions.
Synonym(s): nervus lingualis [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lingual nerve

A sensory nerve providing sensation to the inside of the jaw and tongue. It is a branch of the mandibular nerve—the lower of the three divisions of the great sensory nerve of the face, the trigeminal nerve.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lin·gual nerve

(ling'gwăl nĕrv) [TA]
Branch of mandibular nerve [CN V3], passing medial to the lateral pterygoid muscle, between medial pterygoid and mandible, and beneath mucous membrane of floor of mouth to side of the tongue over anterior two thirds of which it is distributed: also supplies mucous membrane of floor of mouth and passes close to lingual side of roots of second and third mandibular molar teeth; is endangered during tooth extractions.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
P value for lingual nerve was 1.000 and for inferior alveolar nerve 0.390 so both had no significance statistically (pgreatre than 0.05).
Post operative swelling, trismus, pain, and nerve impair- ment.1 Many other studies have shown, that post opera- tive swelling, trismus and pain can be reduced by per operative use of steroids.2,3 Among the most serious and often discussed post operative complication, that arises from 3rd molar surgery is trigeminal nerve injury, specifically involvement of either the inferior alveolar nerve or lingual nerve.4 There are three types of peripheral nerve injuries; neuropraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis.
All patients were enquired 24 hours post operatively regarding altered sensation with in the distribu- tion of inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve. The question was asked by an operator who had not per- formed the surgery and who was unaware as to which treatment group the patient belonged.
The overall rate of paresthesia of lingual nerve was 15% and of the inferior alveolar nerve 6.5%.
Paresthesia of the lingual nerve affected 15% of the patients in this study in both groups.
Lingual nerve Damage Following 3rd Molar Sur- gery.
No anatomical variations were found on the inferior alveolar or the lingual nerves origins.
The existence of communicating branches between the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves is also commonly mentioned in most anatomical text books.
described the communication between the mylohyoid and lingual nerves in 12.5 % of 32 heads and first mentioned that this communication could provide another route for collateral sensory transmission, being a possible cause of incomplete anesthesia during dental practice.
The communication between the mylohyoid and lingual nerves in this study was found to occur after the LN passes in close relation to the third molar region.
The present study reinforces the idea of a communicating branch between the mylohyoid and lingual nerves, indicating that some of the sensory components of the MHN, instead of innervating the teeth or chin skin, might also innervate the tongue and surgeons might be aware of this variation for the correct interpretation of the unexpected findings after oral nerves injury.
The chorda tympani is large and enters the mandibular arch; it terminates near a branch of the mandibular nerve, which will become the lingual nerve. By the middle of the fifth week (embryo length: 10 mm), the facial nerve gives off small branches to the posterior digastric premuscle mass.