latitude

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latitude

 [lat´ĭ-tood]
the recording capability of x-ray film.
contrast latitude the ability of a film to record differences in density.
film latitude the ability of an emulsion to record a wide range of densities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lat·i·tude

(la'ti-tūd),
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion. See: latitude film.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
8-9 and point out the lines of latitude and longitude.
The lines of latitude and longitude and the elevation contours that you see on a topographic map are always referenced to a specific datum (look at the fine print under the chart's title).
Lines of latitude representing the tropics and equator are vertically intersected by 24 lines of longitude that intersect Welsh slate and anthracite across the garden plan.
The diagram--in yet another window--depicts Jupiter's orientation overlaid with lines of latitude and longitude, as well as the maximum and minimum visible sizes the planet can attain.
Imagine the lines of latitude and longitude ballooning outward from the Earth and printing themselves on the inside of the sky sphere.
Lines of latitude and longitude help to locate these places specifically.
Lines of Latitude measure distance in degrees [degrees] north IN) and south (S) of the equator, an imaginary tine circling the globe halfway between the North and South pores.