extrapolation

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Related to Linear extrapolation: Linear interpolation

extrapolation

 [ek-strap″o-la´shun]
inference of one or more unknown values on the basis of that which is known or has been observed; usually applied to estimation beyond the upper and lower ranges of observed data as opposed to interpolation between data points.

extrapolation

/ex·trap·o·la·tion/ (ek-strap″ah-la´shun) inference of a value on the basis of that which is known or has been observed.

extrapolation

the estimation of a value beyond a given series, for example, the extension of the line of a graph beyond the calculated points.

extrapolation

inference of a value on the basis of that which is known or has been observed; usually applied to estimation beyond the range of observed data as opposed to interpolation between data points.
References in periodicals archive ?
EPA finalized the cancer guidelines in 2005, it garbled the logic further, claiming that linear extrapolation
In this study, an inverse method in addition to the linear extrapolation method was applied for estimating the time varying thermal contact conductance.
Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the particle size distribution which gives rise to linear segments is not known, linear extrapolation to P = 0 covers a size range which it is difficult to actually measure.
e] should be approximately independent of the variations in effective strain rate over the range of ligaments used for the linear extrapolations (variations in [[sigma].
Furthermore, whereas linear extrapolation involves extrapolation in the same population to a smaller level of effect, the standard uncertainty factor approach involves extrapolation across populations at a fixed level of effect.
Among the changes incorporated in this recommendation are a) providing quantitative low-dose-extrapolated risk estimates not only for cancer, as is currently done, but for all types of health effects; b) basing the quantitative approach not on the type of toxic effect (whether cancer or not), but on consideration of the perceived individual dose responses, the nature of human variability, and how the toxic substance interacts with background processes that contribute to background toxicity; c) not restricting linear extrapolation to carcinogenic responses but applying it to some noncarcinogenic responses as well; and d) providing not just a single estimate of risk but a probabilistic description.
a proportional decrease from the linear extrapolation without threshold value computed at high doses) (25).

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