lineage

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lin·e·age

(lin'ē-ăj),
Descent in a line from a common progenitor or source.
[O. Fr. ligne, line of descent]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lineage

(lĭn′ē-ĭj)
n.
1.
a. Direct descent from a particular ancestor; ancestry.
b. Derivation.
2. The descendants of a common ancestor considered to be the founder of the line.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lineage

(lĭn′ē-ĭj) [ME. linage]
A group of individuals, animals, cells, or genes that share a common ancestor.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

lineage

a common line of descent from ancient ancestors to modern forms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The geographic differences and temporal trends in the relative frequencies of lineages of E.
The two known diploid lineages of Lasaea are restricted in their distribution to Australia and are morphologically distinct from their polyploid congeners.
Any children she bears belong to her lineage and inherit from their maternal kin.(16) Upon death, a male is succeeded by his sister's sons.
In February 2019, Lineage's commitment to innovation was recognised by Fast Company, as the company was included on their list of the world's 50 Most Innovative Companies of 2019 and was named No.
All predictions made by SNPIT across all the subspecies, lineages, and sublineages were consistent with the maximum-likelihood phylogeny for all isolates in the validation set (Table 1).
However, it remained unclear how the various progenitors can be distinguished at the molecular level, and what molecular mechanisms promote specification into a particular heart region or cardiac lineage.
However, they were nonetheless coterminous with the latter before the rise of the lineage: important tutelary deities were not monopolized by one kinship group, their cults were seldom exclusive, and a great variety of surname groups were involved as its advocates, members, managers, and devotees.
Concerning the dependent-lineage systems, the genome of the queen of the hosts is one of two distinct genetic lineages, but workers produced by both types of maternal colonies are F1 hybrids, suggesting that detection of intruders by workers may be similar for colonies within a particular system (i.e., J1-J2) regardless of maternal lineage.
The effect was particularly strong during the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous period, when clam lineages with the highest 'background' rates of extinction during more normal times were hardest hit.
We defined 26 Y-chromosomal lineages by typing 44 Y-chromosomal polymorphisms in 362 males from four different ethnic groups from Madagascar and 10 potential ancestral populations in Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific.
NIDCR: All aspects of normal and abnormal craniofacial development, including genetics, complex origins of craniofacial disorders, cell lineages and differentiation, cell signaling and gene regulation, embryonic patterning, imaging, biomimetics, and new technologies for high-throughput genetic and protein screens.