liniment

(redirected from Linament)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

liniment

 [lin´ĭ-ment]
a medicinal preparation in an oily, soapy, or alcoholic vehicle, intended to be rubbed on the skin as a counterirritant or anodyne.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-ment), Avoid the misspelling linament.
A liquid preparation for external application or application to the gums; they may be clear dispersions, suspensions, or emulsions, and are frequently applied by friction to the skin; used as counterirritants, rubefacients, anodynes, or cleansing agents.
[L., fr. lino, to smear]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

liniment

(lĭn′ə-mənt)
n.
A medicinal fluid rubbed into the skin to soothe pain or relieve stiffness.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

liniment

Herbal medicine
A format for delivering a herbal medicine in which an extract of the herb is infused in an oil, alcohol or other volatile base, often heated and applied topically.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-mĕnt)
A liquid preparation for external use, frequently applied by friction to the skin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

liniment

An irritating fluid rubbed into the skin to promote a mild inflammatory increase in the blood supply to the underlying tissues. Liniments are of limited therapeutic value, but usually have an impressive smell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-mĕnt)
Liquid preparation for external application or application to gingiva; frequently applied by friction to skin; used as counterirritants, rubefacients, or cleansing agents.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
2) I have no criticism of the Reading vet, but if you walk into any race paddock you can smell linament.
As a fellow sufferer, my sympathy goes to the swashbuckling old striker - but I can assure him that linament is cheaper, effective and does less damage when applied externally.
Don't forget to make a will and pack the linament...
Matchroom spokesman John Wischhusen says: "I'm delighted Eamonn is smelling the linament again.
PERHAPS it's just something they put in the linament at Highbury.
Not the ones with legs up to their armpits who strut around the Milanese catwalks in Versace, but the ones with sweat dripping from their armpits who strut around the halfway line in linament.
The shelves are piled full of saddle soaps and leather balms, ointments and linaments, and whatever other kind of cream that promises to heal.