limiting factor

(redirected from Limiting nutrient)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

limiting factor

  1. (in chemical processes) a component that limits the amount of the product that can be formed or its rate of formation, because it is present in small quantities. For example, light intensity can be a limiting factor in PHOTOSYNTHESIS.
  2. (in ecology) a factor that restricts the numbers of a population, such as food or nest sites.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on NT: TP stoichiometric proportions, results have indicated phosphorus as a possible limiting nutrient most of the year in the Pereira de Miranda Reservoir.
where N(t) is the amount of limiting nutrient at time t, P(t) is the biomass of phytoplankton at time t, and Z(t) is the biomass of phytoplankton at time t.
At first glance, Mg was the most limiting nutrient. Setting Mg equal to 0.21% instead of 0.11%, the Aitchison distance was 0.329, still well above the critical value.
At this stage, this study has demonstrated that P and N are closely related as limiting nutrients in this region for field pea production; which one of them is the most limiting is a rather circumstantial phenomenon.
Therefore, the objectives of this project were to 1) determine which nutrient was in limitation across the thermal gradient and 2) determine if the natural phytoplankton assemblages at three points along the gradient differed with respect to uptake rate of the limiting nutrient.
Nitrogen is often considered a limiting nutrient for grasshoppers (Joern & Behmer 1997, 1998, White 1993); but a significant nitrogen investment by females into eggs may provide a nitrogen reserve to be drawn upon during early development, a time when small size may limit young grasshoppers to explore and select foods that best match nitrogen needs.
It is a limiting nutrient for algal growth in lakes.
In tropical and temperate forests nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) resorption from senesced leaves may reflect a plant strategy of conservation of a limiting nutrient (Edwards and Grubb 1982, Vitousek and Sanford 1986, Proctor et al.
With energy the most limiting nutrient in finishing rations, comparing feeds on the basis of cost per unit of energy supplied is a useful starting-point, said MLC beef & sheep scientist Mary Brown.
Despite the abundance of e lemental nitrogen, fixed nitrogen is frequently what scientists call a "limiting nutrient." Under normal natural conditions, it is often in short supply, so the level of available nitrogen is a key regulator of ecological processes.
Second, nutrients may indeed limit decomposition, but studies showing neutral effects may not have added the limiting nutrient or sufficient nutrient to overcome limitation.
These results suggest that, at S slopes, limiting nutrient and moisture conditions lead to low concentrations of limiting nutrients in plant biomass and to accumulation of carbohydrates.