limiting factor

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limiting factor

  1. (in chemical processes) a component that limits the amount of the product that can be formed or its rate of formation, because it is present in small quantities. For example, light intensity can be a limiting factor in PHOTOSYNTHESIS.
  2. (in ecology) a factor that restricts the numbers of a population, such as food or nest sites.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on NT: TP stoichiometric proportions, results have indicated phosphorus as a possible limiting nutrient most of the year in the Pereira de Miranda Reservoir.
At this stage, this study has demonstrated that P and N are closely related as limiting nutrients in this region for field pea production; which one of them is the most limiting is a rather circumstantial phenomenon.
The most common limiting nutrients in lake primary production are nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), which generally occur at lower concentrations than would saturate primary production.
Because temperature is known to increase rates of reaction, our hypothesis was that uptake rate of the limiting nutrient would increase with increasing temperature.
With energy the most limiting nutrient in finishing rations, comparing feeds on the basis of cost per unit of energy supplied is a useful starting-point, said MLC beef & sheep scientist Mary Brown.
For farmers in the industrialized countries--and increasingly, in the developing countries as well--this limiting nutrient is now available in virtually limitless quantities.
Second, nutrients may indeed limit decomposition, but studies showing neutral effects may not have added the limiting nutrient or sufficient nutrient to overcome limitation.
Locally, this increase in N fixation is manifested as greater nitrogen loading to coastal ecosystems, systems in which nitrogen is often the principal limiting nutrient for primary producers (2).
By studying transporter proteins and their control systems, molecular geneticists may be able to bypass the feedback mechanisms in plants limiting nutrient uptake.
Plant species adapted to oligotrophic conditions are predicted to have a smaller proportional response to increased supplies of a limiting nutrient than wild plants associated with fertile soils or crop plants (Grime 1977, Chapin 1980, Chapin et al.
Algal assays have been used primarily to 1) assess the nutritional status of the water in question; 2) determine the limiting nutrient for phytoplankton growth; and 3) determine the presence of toxic substances (Claesson and Forsberg, 1978).