lignocellulose

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lignocellulose

(lĭg′nō-sĕl′yə-lōs′)
n.
A combination of lignin and cellulose that strengthens woody plant cells.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Han, "Process systems engineering studies for catalytic production of bio-based platform molecules from lignocellulosic biomass," Energy Conversion and Management, vol.
Spectral FTIR data of both analyzed LVS and MLV samples (Table 5) are typical for the lignocellulosic biomass. Due to the complex nature of LVS biomass, no significant changes were observed in the region of 4000-2000 [cm.sup.-1] after alkaline pretreatment.
In this context, Trichoderma reesei may play an important role in decreasing costs for bioethanol production, whereas it is the filamentous fungus with the greatest capacity of degrading the lignocellulosic biomass [2, 15, 32].
Similar to steam and ammonia explosion pretreatment, C[O.sub.2] explosion is also used for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Zheng et al., (1998) compared C[O.sub.2] explosion with steam and ammonia explosion for pretreatment of recycled paper mixture, sugarcane bagasse and pulping waste of recycled paper and found that C[O.sub.2] explosion was more cost effective than ammonia explosion and did not cause the formation of inhibitory compound that could occur in steam explosion.
The palm oil industry is reported to generate great volumes of lignocellulosic biomass during plantation and palm oil extraction process.
These biochemistry characterizations suggested that recombinant CtCel6 had a great prospect of commercial application in bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.
A mixture of the three major inhibitors produced during lignocellulosic biomass treatment, acetic acid, furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, were evaluated on P.
Ethanol production from lignocellulosic material is a topic of interest because it does not undermine crops used for human consumption but it uses various sources of lignocellulosic biomass such as agricultural and municipal solid wastes [1].
For lignocellulosic biomass, the CrI indicates the relative amount of crystalline cellulose in the substrates.
At the same time, domestic growth in pellet demand for power production may require another 9 million tons per year of lignocellulosic biomass when the EPA's mandated Clean Power Plan is put in place in 2022.
This lignocellulosic biomass does not compete with the food industry and is particularly attractive for production of bioethanol (SAHA et al., 2013).