lignin

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lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
LE4 and LE6 strains were selected to develop the ligninase production curve because these strains have shown the highest enzymatic index for laccase.
Since it was not possible to select the strains for carrying out the induction curve of cellulases by semi-quantitative evaluation, the same strains used in the ligninase production curve were chosen for the cellulase induction curve too.
The performance of the strains with respect to the production of cellulase and ligninase was different.
edodes strains in different media, (ii) select those with the highest potential for producing cellulases and ligninases by semiquantitative tests and (iii) quantitatively characterize these strains for the production of enzymes laccase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, endo-1,4-[beta]-glucanase, exo-1,4-[beta]-glucanase and [beta]-glucosidase in the growth medium selected as best for the strains.
Manganese, for example, is essential in the enzymes (ligninases) that fungi secrete to decompose lignin in the environment.