scattering

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scattering

 [skat´er-ing]
a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.

scattering

Etymology: ME, scateren
a change in the direction of photons caused by the interaction between photons and matter. In coherent scattering, an incident photon interacts with matter and excites an atom, causing it to vibrate. The vibration causes the photon to scatter. Also called Thompson scattering, unmodified scattering. In Compton scattering an incident photon interacts with an orbital electron, transferring some of its energy to that electron. The electron is ejected, and the photon is scattered.

scattering

a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the PVC is gradually increased, the dependent light scattering phenomenon is progressively enhanced, giving rise to three different types of light propagation regimes, characterized by [GAMMA](r, [phi]) < 1, [GAMMA](r, [phi]) [?
0, so incorporating air into a coating film has a significant impact on coating light scattering and hiding power.
This point of view was clearly upheld by Fitzwater and Hook III (3) in a famous, award winning article, which proposed a novel theory for calculating the effect of dependent light scattering in white coatings.
Light scattering techniques for particle size measurements fa]l into two main categories, often referred to as static and dynamic.
Light scattering interferes with nephelometric and turbidimetric methods by mimicking the analyte-reagent product, analogous to the protean interferentes of bilirubin in spectrophotometric methods (1).
In the case of a highly dilute system, the light scattering intensity of a distribution of N particles corresponds to the sum of the intensities scattered by each particle.
Classical light scattering systems fail to give accurate particle sizing data due mainly to the presence of multiple scattering, whereby light scattered by one particle is rescattered by others before reaching the detector.
Houston, TX-based Viscotek has introduced its Low Angle Light Scattering (IALS) Detector for determination of absolute molecular weight.
The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that polarized light scattering can be used to rapidly and non-destructively measure the distribution function of fibers in paper as the paper is being made.
This theory is then used when we employ static laser light scattering (SLS) to carefully characterize both the high molecular weight polyurethane substrate and the isolated enzymes, and time resolved laser light scattering (TRSLS) to determine the absolute rate of degradation and to characterize enzymes believed to hydrolyze polyurethane.
RP-1 uses Raman inelastic light scattering, which is an identification technology first developed in the 1930s and enhanced in the 1960s with the use of lasers.