ligand

(redirected from Ligands)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-2: FT-IR data of ligands (L1/L2) and their complexes.
Structures of Ligands (L1/L2) were confirmed by the formation of amide bond between Betulinic acid and 2 and 3-nitroaniline.
The electronic absorption spectra of pyrazoloisoindol derivative ligand and its [Ag.sup.+], [Co.sup.2+], [Hg.sup.2+], [Zn.sup.2+], [Ni.sup.2+], [Cu.sup.2+], [Cd.sup.2+], [Mn.sup.2+], [Cr.sup.3+], [Fe.sup.3+] and [Pb.sup.2+] complexes in acetonitrile are shown in Figure 2.
According to the data in Table 1, the bonds in the spectrum of ligands and metal complexes are characteristic adsorptions bands.
In summation, a reduction in the absorption and emission energy is observed with the changing of the functional group on the polypyridyl ligand from the bromo (BPIP), to the aldehyde (FPIP) to the nitrile (CPIP) and then the nitro-(NPIP-) based ligands.
We downloaded data for 3055 GPCRs, 276,324 ligands, and 811,601 GPCR-ligand bindings from the GLASS database [9].
Ligands A and B bind in a non-competitive manner if their binding sites do not overlap and formation of the ternary complex RAB can occur.
Wasserman, "G-Quadruplex ligands: potent inhibitors of telomerase activity and cell proliferation in Plasmodium falciparum," Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology, vol.
2.2, Antigens and TLR Ligands, Recombinant ovalbumin (OVA) was produced according to Schulke et al.
As a primary ligand and someBiologically important amino acids as secondary ligands.