ligand

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ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

/li·gand/ (li´gand) (lig´and) an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

ligand

[lig′ənd, lī′gənd]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central metal atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in oxyhemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2 an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a cell surface or to a tracer element. The binding is reversible in a competitive binding assay. It may be the analyte or a cross-reactant. Examples include vitamin B12, a ligand with intrinsic factor as the binding protein, and various antigens, which are ligands with antibody-binding proteins.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

(līgənd),
n 1. a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in hemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2. an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a surface or to a tracer element.

ligand

an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or part of a molecule that specifically binds to form a complex with another molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated discovers, develops and markets new drugs that address critical unmet medical needs of patients in the areas of cancer, skin diseases, and men's and women's hormone-related diseases, as well as osteoporosis, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.
This news release may contain certain forward-looking statements by Ligand and actual results could differ materially from those described as a result of factors including but not limited to the following.
Ligand disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements beyond the date of this release.
Note: Panretin(R) and Targretin(R) are registered trademarks of Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, and ONTAK(R) is a registered trademark of Seragen, Inc.
Additional preclinical studies have shown that a combined therapy of Targretin and tamoxifen cause complete or partial regression in 94% of tamoxifen-resistant primary breast tumors, as reported by Eric Bischoff, a Ligand Research Scientist, on April 13, 1999, at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).
As a result of the positive indications from multiple pre-clinical studies, Ligand launched a Phase II clinical trial in November 1998 to assess the effectiveness of Targretin capsules in the treatment of women with advanced breast cancer.
Ligand has also studied Targretin for the treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, for which Ligand expects to file a new drug application for Targretin capsules in the first half of 1999, as well as for advanced lung cancer, ovarian cancer, head and neck cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, psoriasis and actinic keratoses.