life table

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table

 [ta´b'l]
a flat layer or surface.
cohort life table a life table giving the survival data of a cohort of individuals in a clinical study or trial, i.e., the number alive and under observation (not lost to follow-up) at the beginning of each year, the number dying in each year, the number lost to follow-up each year, the conditional probability of survival for each year, and the cumulative probabilities of survival from the beginning of the study to the end of each year.
inner table the inner compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
life table any of various tables describing mortality and survival data for groups of individuals at specific times or over defined intervals; tables may summarize combined mortality experience by age over a brief period or may follow a cohort over time (cohort life table).
outer table the outer compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
tilt table a plinth, equipped with a footboard for support, to which a patient can be strapped for rotation to a nearly upright position; used in cases of spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders to enhance blood circulation to the lower limbs, improve posture, and aid in muscle training and sense of balance.
vitreous table inner table.

life ta·ble

a representation of the probable years of survivorship of a defined population of subjects; given that survivorship is changed by new methods of prevention or treatment, a diachronic study is commonly used, the main interest of which lies in the composite structure of the current population. (In the summarizing technique used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in a population, survivors to age x are denoted by the symbol lx and the expectation of life at age x is denoted by the symbol x.)

life table

Public health A table that presents the results of a clinical study in which subjects enter and leave the trial at different times; each subject has a well-defined point of entry–onset of treatment and end point–relapse, death or other; all subjects may be evaluated at determined intervals with respect to the expected survival of an idealized person, based on actuarial analysis of census data and mortality rates

life ta·ble

(līf tā'bĕl)
A representation of the probable years of survivorship of a defined population of subjects.

life table

a table giving details of the mortality of a species or organism and all stages of the life history.

life table

a tabulation of deaths occurring in age groups, often with other information; may be a current life table, when all of the animals in a population at one time are surveyed, or a cohort table, when all of the animals born in a particular time span are dealt with as a group.
References in periodicals archive ?
5] shortens their life spans, we also used a life table approach to estimate changes in population longevity through the year 2050.
Life tables were principally constructed from the survival rate and fecundity data (Table 3).
Life tables provide an interesting approach to introducing concepts in probability.
Approximations for estimating change in life expectancy attributable to air pollution in relation to multiple causes of death using a cause modified life table.
different genders by using gender-based life tables rather than unisex
As can also be deduced from Figure 6, the second factor that affects the precision implicit in DALYs calculation are disability weights and the less important factors are the survival assumptions taken from life tables and the discount rate.
Wong and his colleagues updated the data, using information from the United Network for Organ Sharing; the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; and life tables from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
He focuses on the themes of descriptive statistical procedures, probability, statistical inference, and statistical techniques for determining appropriate sample size and assessing data, covering data and descriptive measures, standardizing rates, describing data with graphs, life tables, probability, random variables and probability distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, sample size, study designs, statistical measures of association among variables, experimental studies, survival analysis, and cause and effect.
Different life tables could produce different values even if they have the same life expectancy.
To project the population from one year to the next, survival rates by age and sex are needed and, to obtain future survival rates, future life tables may be constructed.