maturation

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maturation

 [mach″u-ra´shun]
1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development; attainment of maximal intellectual and emotional development.
2. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to half the number characteristic of the species.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mat'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule, for example, posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.
4. The overall process leading to the incorporation of a viral genome into a capsid and the development of a complete virion.
[L. maturatio, a ripening, fr. maturus, ripe]

maturation

/mat·u·ra·tion/ (mach-u-ra´shun)
1. the process of becoming mature.
2. attainment of emotional and intellectual maturity.
3. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cells is reduced to one half the number characteristic of the species.

maturation

(măch′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The process of becoming mature.
2. Biology
a. The processes by which gametes are formed, including the reduction of chromosomes in a germ cell from the diploid number to the haploid number by meiosis.
b. The final differentiation processes in biological systems, such as the final ripening of a seed or the attainment of full functional capacity by a cell, a tissue, or an organ.

mat′u·ra′tion·al adj.
mat′u·ra′tive adj.

maturation

[mach′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, maturare, to ripen
1 the process or condition of attaining complete development. In humans it is the unfolding of full physical, emotional, and intellectual capacities that enable a person to function at a higher level of competency and adaptability within the environment.
2 the final stages in the meiotic formation of germ cells in which the number of chromosomes in each cell is reduced to the haploid number characteristic of the species. See also meiosis, oogenesis, spermatogenesis.
3 suppuration. maturate, v.

maturation

The process of development.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule; e.g., posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.

maturation (viral)

the collection of infective VIRIONS produced in the host cell.

Maturation

The process by which stem cells transform from immature cells without a specific function into a particular type of blood cell with defined functions.
Mentioned in: Leukemias, Chronic

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
Achievement of full development or growth.

maturation (mach´ərā´shən),

n the process through which an organism or body structure arrives at a state of complete development. In dentistry, this is the point at which an individual's periodontium or its parts have reached their full adult form, size, and function.

maturation

1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development. In biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to one-half the number characteristic of the species.
2. the formation of pus.

maturation arrest
an interruption in the progressive development of erythrocytes, characterized by a bone marrow dominated by macrocytes and megaloblasts. Seen in anemias caused by deficiency of folic acid and vitamin B12.
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous toxicokinetic factors differ across life stages, particularly because of rapidly changing physiology and the immaturity of various systems in utero and in early life.
The study uses a life stage approach based on the assumption that the experiences of the different groups illuminate current and future trends related to consumption and saving/borrowing patterns.
If companies want to avoid the new adjustment factors, he says, they will have to conduct full-lifetime exposure studies or convincing mechanistic studies that account for early life stage sensitivities.
in testing protocols), applied more often, on functional outcomes at relevant life stages in animal models and humans; the methods should be sensitive and specific and should account for variability in responses and norms
In concert, the Life Stages worm emails itself to everyone in the user's Microsoft Outlook address books which can create a flood of emails that bottleneck and incapacitate the system.
To maximize their employees' understanding of - and appreciation for - their benefits program, employers should provide targeted benefits education and advice based on employee life stage.
However, by using the models according to Equations 1 and 2 in our own life table analyses, we sometimes obtained survival rates of certain life stages that were greater than 100% (Zhou et al.
There are four key life stages identified in our white paper, many of which have global market implications," said Morris.
The parasites, protozoans in the genus Plasmodium, exist in several distinct life stages within the human body, each of which has different treatment requirements.
For this study, the researchers evaluated the supercooling point (SCP) and the lower lethal temperature (LLT) for all life stages of bed bugs, as well as their potential to feed after exposure to sublethal temperatures.
Life Stages and Native Women: Memory, Teaching, and Story Medicine.
Using life-history theory to understand child growth in an evolutionary perspective, he posits that life stages use hormones as a major tool and provide periods of adaptive plasticity that modify body structures and behaviors.