Lieutaud

Lieu·taud

(lyū-tō'),
Joseph, French anatomist and pathologist, 1703-1780. See: Lieutaud body, Lieutaud triangle, Lieutaud trigone, Lieutaud uvula.
References in periodicals archive ?
1767 by Joseph Lieutaud the founder of pathologic anatomy in France in study of 3000 autopsies where he found two cases of pleural tumors." In 1819 RenACopyright-ThACopyrightophile-Hyacinthe Laennec the French physician based upon his understanding of the nature of pleural cells suggested the origin from the pleura.
Lieutaud accepted this word in his Precis de la medecine pratique (Paris: Vincent, 1759) and made it a household word: "il faut encore mettre sous ce titre [du delire melancolique] la nostalgie, qu'on appelle communement la maladie du pays, quoique le desir de revoir sa patrie soit souvent tres-raisonnable" (p.
We're at Nabou's apartment, which is painted sunny yellow and looks out on a quiet side street splitting off from the hectic Cours Lieutaud. Haunting Senegalese music echoes from her CD player; children shout on the sidewalk below; the curtains are stirring with a breeze bringing in the warmth of the sun and the salty sea air.
Landlord Laurent Lieutaud, who had been advised by police to close down until after today's game, said: "Until about 11:30pm it was high spirited but trouble free.
Lieutaud accepted it in his Precis de medecine pratique (Paris: Vincent, 1759) as a form of the "desir melancolique [...] qu'on appelle communement la maladie du pays" and made it a household term.