lie detector

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lie detector

Psychology A device that detects chest and abdominal movement during respiration, heart rate, BP, and galvanic skin conductance due to sweating. See Polygraph test.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lie detector

A popular terms for the polygraph—a collection of devices used to monitor and record various parameters of the body, such as the pulse rate, the blood pressure, the evenness and rate of breathing and the moistness, and hence the electrical resistance, of the skin. These vary with the state of the emotions and the results can be thought to cast light on significance to the subject of certain questions or statements. Emotional responses do not, however, necessarily indicate that the subject is lying or concealing the truth. Lie detection is a function of the interpreter, not the machine and it is the sensitivity, intelligence, imagination and experience of the operator that determines the forensic value of the procedure. This should always be challenged if lie detector evidence is used in court.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He added: "If it wasn't for the lie-detector test we might not be sitting here today."
Before the lie-detector results, Betty admits on the show: "I was convicted of shoplifting 12 to 15 years ago but that is all in the past.
Yet the thought apparently seldom occurs to some police investigators that a person may be rendered unfit for a lie-detector test by an extensive interrogation based upon frequent and constant accusations of guilt.
Tytler and arms dealer Abhishek Verma were earlier asked by the court to appear in person or file an affidavit stating if they wanted to undergo lie-detector test or not.
"I'd have to think about the arguments (for lie-detector tests) one side and another first.
David Gest challenged estranged wife Liza Minnelli yesterday to take a lie-detector test in his bid to prove that she battered him during drunken rages.
The lie-detector test was commissioned by his lawyer, Abbe Lowell, who said the probability of deception was one-hundredth of one per cent.
Verma, a witness in a 1984 anti-Sikh riots case allegedly involving Congress leader Jagdish Tytler, on July 6 told a Delhi court that he was ready to undergo a lie-detector test if he and his family are provided security.
VLADIMIR ROMANOV last night revealed he has introduced lie-detector tests at Hearts.
POLYGRAPHS, or lie-detector tests, have been around in some form since the late 1800s.
Any information gleamed from the lie-detector, which cannot be used as evidence in court, is then passed on to police officers to take matters further.
Police investigating the death of White House intern Chandra Levy want to give a second lie-detector test to a man already in prison for attacking two women in the park where Levy's remains were found.