Librium


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Librium

 [lib´re-um]
trademark for preparations of chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride, an antianxiety agent.

Librium

(lĭb′rē-əm)
A trademark for the drug chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride.

Librium®

Chlordiazepoxide, see there.

Librium

A brand name for CHLORDIAZEPOXIDE.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, she incorporates oral, history interviews with two pharmaceutical innovators, Frank Berger (who discovered Miltown) and Leo Sternbach (who discovered Librium and Valium).
In The Age of Anxiety, Tone discusses research published as early as 1961 that documented the potentially serious withdrawal reactions that could occur with medications such as Librium and Valium.
With them, I'd go through the motions mechanically: the statement of the obvious ("You're an alcoholic, and you're destroying your liver."); the taper of Librium, a medication that mimicked the effects of alcohol in a safe, controllable way; the Alcoholics Anonymous recommendation; the clinic appointment for follow-up that was never kept.
Williams ordered a dose of 25 mg Librium to ease the effects of withdrawal.
Emagrece Sim and Herbathin contain chlordiazepoxide HCl (the active ingredient in Librium) and fluoxetine HCl (the active ingredient in Prozac).
Tests of the two dietary supplements, Emagrece Sim and Herbathin, show that they can contain chlordiazepoxide (the active ingredient in Librium), fluoxetine (Prozac), and fenproporex, an unapproved stimulant that the body converts to amphetamine.
By the mid 1970s, a decade after its introduction to the drugs market, Valium, or Diazepam, had replaced Librium as the most commonly prescribed tranquilizer.
The most commonly used benzodiazepines are diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), and lorazepam (Ativan).
Such people account for a high proportion of the consumption of minor tranquillizers like Librium and Valium.
In the 1960s, owner Arthur Sackler, a physician and pioneer in direct-to-consumer advertising, helped create the marketing buzz for Librium and Valium, the greatest pharmaceutical successes of their era.