Libby Zion


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A young woman who died after admission to the A&E/ER of a New York teaching hospital in 1984; her death was ultimately attributed to inadequate care provided by overworked and undersupervised medical house officers

Libby Zion

Graduate education A young ♀ who died after admission to the ER of a NYC hospital in 1984; her death was attributed to inadequate care provided by overworked and undersupervised medical house officers. See 405 Regulations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the night, Libby Zion became more agitated and eventually decompensated.
Few stories illustrate this as well as the one dealing with the death of 18-year-old Libby Zion 30 years ago.
In 1984, an 18-year-old woman named Libby Zion presented to a New York hospital with fever and agitation, and died less than 24 hours after admission with an undiagnosed illness.
In 1984, 18-year-old Libby Zion presented to a New York hospital with fever and agitation, and died less than 24 hours after admission with an undiagnosed illness.
Hospitals in New York state have been dealing with work hour limits and supervision requirements since 1988, several years after the death of Libby Zion in a teaching hospital spurred the state to take action.
The only state which has already enacted such legislation is New York, in response to the 1984 death in New York Hospital of teenager Libby Zion, which occurred when an overworked resident declined to come to her bedside.
These new regulations result from a public debate, which began in 1984 with the death of Libby Zion front a drug interaction in a New York hospital, about the issue of whether staff fatigue imperils the health and safety of patients.
On March 4, 1984, Libby Zion, 058 an 18-year-old college freshman, "entered an emergency room [of New York Hospital] with `a virus that has been going around' and .
Libby Zion was admitted to the hospital with a high fever.
The most famous case of this type of drug interaction was that of Libby Zion, a young woman admitted to a New York hospital in March 1984 for fever and tremors.
It was passed after there was reason to believe that overworked interns and residents had contributed to the death of 18-year-old Libby Zion.
Libby Zion was admitted to the hospital late at night with symptoms of fever and agitation.